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KWCR Music News

 Dave Reeder

Salt Lake Vocal Artists perform on their European tour. (Source: Dave Reeder)

There’s an amazing feeling when returning from a long journey. For the Salt Lake Vocal Artists (SLVA), it’s a feeling they know all too well. They have traveled far away to sing at least once a year (and often much more), since their creation in 2010.  Still, this return, from their festival performances at Chorbiennale Aachen in Germany, felt a little bit different. They weren’t just returning to their individual homes. For the first time, the choir itself is coming home to its own building. A permanent home.

SLVA is the ambassador choir of the larger Salt Lake Choral Artists, under the direction of Dr. Brady Allred. The organization began sometime in the 1970’s as the Jay Welch Chorale. Upon the former director’s retirement, the search for a new artistic director brought in Allred in 2004. A name change was not all that came with the new direction Dr. Allred saw. One large choir became two, then three and is now seven choirs. Men’s, women’s, children’s and youth honor choirs add to the mixed voice concert, chamber choir and the Vocal Artists. In addition, there are choral workshops that give something for everyone and every ability, according to their website.

Providing many opportunities for the community to get involved in is the vision of the organization and Dr. Allred.

“I very much believe in the power of choral music and singing together,” he says. It’s his conviction that singing, not just alone but as a group, helps to bring diversity and at the same time a sense of community. It helps people remember their heritage and grow, as we learn new skills. As we meet and work with new people, minds grow and talents expand.

One choir could exist on its own, practicing in borrowed spaces and renting at times when necessary, but in order to provide the opportunities for so many people in the community to sing together, the growing choral artists need a home. The search began, and the former LDS Church building on 700 N. 200 West in Salt Lake City seemed a good fit. At the time of the search, it housed an architectural firm whose needs were no longer met by the building, but the asking price was $1 million. This is a tidy sum for a business with a lot of capital, even more so for a non-profit organization like the Choral Artists.  The Benjamin Foundation graciously provided a challenge grant of the first half, providing that SLCA could raise the rest before August of 2015, which was only three short years away at the time.

Brady Allred

Brady Allred conducts and instructs a summer choral workshop at the Salt Lake Choral Artists Building on Thursday, June 18. (Emily Crooks / The Signpost)

Allred’s vision inspired the choir, and they were united to accomplish the task. The power of the music spread through choir members, and they knew that together they could accomplish this task. Shortly before the Vocal Artist’s tour in Germany, they met the final goal and secured their permanent home.

It’s fitting for a choir that sing’s Bernstein’s sacred works, Bach, an annual Christmas concert and so much more to meet in a Victorian style church where people once met to sing hymns of faith as a congregation. The beauty of the music being made there is enhanced by the beauty of the architecture and the art from local artists hanging throughout the building. On having a home, Associate Director Jane Fjeldstedt (director of the Women’s and Men’s Choir) mirrors Dr. Allred’s words when she says that it “feels good” to come through the doors. It feels like home to them.

It comes back to Dr. Allred’s words, “The main vision I have is that everybody should have the opportunity to sing.”

Knowing that he had singers of all levels from beginners to gifted, he wanted to meet the needs of all of them. The Salt Lake Vocal Artists was formed to give those with professional level skills a chance to challenge themselves. That challenge is often met by commissioning new music for their performances and tours, both in the U.S. and abroad, with voices that unite almost as one. If you ask these singers what their favorite commissioned piece to perform is, you’ll hear individual favorites, but they all will mention “Stars” by Erik Esevalds. Kelly Nelson mentions that she loves it, even though it is a lot of work for her being entrusted to tune the wine glasses. That, combined with the tibetan singing bowls, helps to give the piece it’s other-worldly sound. Each performance of it, including their recent tour, receives both a hush and thunderous applause, followed often by a standing ovation. It’s no wonder this organization as a whole has received the Best of State award for a choir every year since 2012.

In 2015-2016 their season begins with:

“Every Time I Feel the Spirit:  Psalms and Spirituals”

Friday, October 16, 2015, 7–10 p.m., rehearsal, Libby Gardner Hall

Saturday, October 17, 2015, 2 p.m. and 7:30 pm concerts, Libby Gardner Hall featuring the music of John Rutter.

There are four other concerts, including their annual Christmas concert, “Come Away to the Skies: Bluegrass Music,” “The Lamb of God: Passion According to St. Matthew” and “Dances to Life: Music for the Living.” A full schedule, including upcoming sessions of the Summer Choral Institute and more information about hearing, singing with and donating to the organization or album sales, can be found at http://www.saltlakechoralartists.org. For videos, search YouTube for The Salt Lake Choral Artists and Salt Lake Vocal Artists.

 Dave Reeder)  Dave Reeder)  Dave Reeder)  Dave Reeder)  Dave Reeder)  Dave Reeder) Salt Lake Vocal Artists conductor Brady Allred instructs a summer choral workshop at the Salt Lake Choral Artists Building on Thursday, June 18. (Emily Crooks / The Signpost) Jane Fjeldsted and Brady Allred instruct a summer choral workshop at the Salt Lake Choral Artists Building on Thursday, June 18. (Emily Crooks / The Signpost) Salt Lake Vocal Artists conductor Brady Allred instructs a summer choral workshop at the Salt Lake Choral Artists Building on Thursday, June 18. (Emily Crooks / The Signpost) Jane Fjeldsted and Brady Allred teach breathing techniques to vocalists at the Salt Lake Choral Artists Building on Thursday, June 18. (Emily Crooks / The Signpost) The Salt Lake Choral Artists Building is decorated with artworks and instruments. (Emily Crooks / The Signpost) The Salt Lake Choral Artists Building is decorated with artworks and instruments. (Emily Crooks / The Signpost) The Salt Lake Choral Artists Building is decorated with artworks and instruments. (Emily Crooks / The Signpost) The Salt Lake Choral Artists Building is home to  talented vocal artists, as well as those interested in vocal lessons. (Emily Crooks / The Signpost)

Salt Lake Vocal Artists perform on their European tour. (Source: Dave Reeder)

There’s an amazing feeling when returning from a long journey. For the Salt Lake Vocal Artists (SLVA), it’s a feeling they know all too well. They have traveled far away to sing at least once a year (and often much more), since their creation in 2010.  Still, this return, from their festival performances at Chorbiennale Aachen in Germany, felt a little bit different. They weren’t just returning to their individual homes. For the first time, the choir itself is coming home to its own building. A permanent home.

SLVA is the ambassador choir of the larger Salt Lake Choral Artists, under the direction of Dr. Brady Allred. The organization began sometime in the 1970’s as the Jay Welch Chorale. Upon the former director’s retirement, the search for a new artistic director brought in Allred in 2004. A name change was not all that came with the new direction Dr. Allred saw. One large choir became two, then three and is now seven choirs. Men’s, women’s, children’s and youth honor choirs add to the mixed voice concert, chamber choir and the Vocal Artists. In addition, there are choral workshops that give something for everyone and every ability, according to their website.

Providing many opportunities for the community to get involved in is the vision of the organization and Dr. Allred.

“I very much believe in the power of choral music and singing together,” he says. It’s his conviction that singing, not just alone but as a group, helps to bring diversity and at the same time a sense of community. It helps people remember their heritage and grow, as we learn new skills. As we meet and work with new people, minds grow and talents expand.

One choir could exist on its own, practicing in borrowed spaces and renting at times when necessary, but in order to provide the opportunities for so many people in the community to sing together, the growing choral artists need a home. The search began, and the former LDS Church building on 700 N. 200 West in Salt Lake City seemed a good fit. At the time of the search, it housed an architectural firm whose needs were no longer met by the building, but the asking price was $1 million. This is a tidy sum for a business with a lot of capital, even more so for a non-profit organization like the Choral Artists.  The Benjamin Foundation graciously provided a challenge grant of the first half, providing that SLCA could raise the rest before August of 2015, which was only three short years away at the time.

Brady Allred conducts and instructs a summer choral workshop at the Salt Lake Choral Artists Building on Thursday, June 18. (Emily Crooks / The Signpost)

Allred’s vision inspired the choir, and they were united to accomplish the task. The power of the music spread through choir members, and they knew that together they could accomplish this task. Shortly before the Vocal Artist’s tour in Germany, they met the final goal and secured their permanent home.

It’s fitting for a choir that sing’s Bernstein’s sacred works, Bach, an annual Christmas concert and so much more to meet in a Victorian style church where people once met to sing hymns of faith as a congregation. The beauty of the music being made there is enhanced by the beauty of the architecture and the art from local artists hanging throughout the building. On having a home, Associate Director Jane Fjeldstedt (director of the Women’s and Men’s Choir) mirrors Dr. Allred’s words when she says that it “feels good” to come through the doors. It feels like home to them.

It comes back to Dr. Allred’s words, “The main vision I have is that everybody should have the opportunity to sing.”

Knowing that he had singers of all levels from beginners to gifted, he wanted to meet the needs of all of them. The Salt Lake Vocal Artists was formed to give those with professional level skills a chance to challenge themselves. That challenge is often met by commissioning new music for their performances and tours, both in the U.S. and abroad, with voices that unite almost as one. If you ask these singers what their favorite commissioned piece to perform is, you’ll hear individual favorites, but they all will mention “Stars” by Erik Esevalds. Kelly Nelson mentions that she loves it, even though it is a lot of work for her being entrusted to tune the wine glasses. That, combined with the tibetan singing bowls, helps to give the piece it’s other-worldly sound. Each performance of it, including their recent tour, receives both a hush and thunderous applause, followed often by a standing ovation. It’s no wonder this organization as a whole has received the Best of State award for a choir every year since 2012.

In 2015-2016 their season begins with:

“Every Time I Feel the Spirit:  Psalms and Spirituals”

Friday, October 16, 2015, 7–10 p.m., rehearsal, Libby Gardner Hall

Saturday, October 17, 2015, 2 p.m. and 7:30 pm concerts, Libby Gardner Hall featuring the music of John Rutter.

There are four other concerts, including their annual Christmas concert, “Come Away to the Skies: Bluegrass Music,” “The Lamb of God: Passion According to St. Matthew” and “Dances to Life: Music for the Living.” A full schedule, including upcoming sessions of the Summer Choral Institute and more information about hearing, singing with and donating to the organization or album sales, can be found at http://www.saltlakechoralartists.org. For videos, search YouTube for The Salt Lake Choral Artists and Salt Lake Vocal Artists.

The annual South Ogden Days festival took place this last weekend, June 16-22, at Friendship Park in South Ogden. It hosted a variety of events from a 5k run to a carnival.

“As a city, we are so grateful for all of the people that come out, the vendors and food guys. We couldn’t do much without them,” James F. Minster, South Ogden City Mayor, said. South Ogden Days attendance has grown from 5,000 to 20,000 people in the last five years.

The Rock N’ Rods Car and Motorcycle Show 2015 was held Friday, June 19th from 5-9 p.m. Treeo, a senior living facility new to the community, sponsored the car show.

“Treeo is new and very active in the community. We’re thankful to have them.” Jill Mccullough, Special Events Coordinator for South Ogden City, said.

The award ceremony for the car and motorcycle show was held at 8 p.m. with a raffle for all of the entries following. Raffle prizes included a lot of summer must-haves, such as a grill, coolers and camping chairs.

The major categories were picked by city officials. The Fire Chief’s choice was a 1965 Daytona Coupe, owned by Kellen Kerr. The Police Chief’s choice was Sherry Robins’ 1940 Coupe Deluxe. Finally, the Mayor’s choice was the 2008 Shelby GT 500 owned by Wes Goldsberry, and the sponsor’s choice was Dave Rowe’s 1930 Chevy Coupe.

Crowds enjoyed the many different cars that were on display at the South Ogden Carnival and Car Show. (Scott Stevens / The Signpost)

Crowds enjoyed the many different cars that were on display at the South Ogden Carnival and Car Show. (Scott Stevens / The Signpost)

The minor categories included sweetest wheels, hottest ride and even best make-out backseat. A 1968 Camaro was voted for hottest ride while a 1930 Ford Model A won the best make-out backseat. Other winners included a 1951 Willys Jeepster, a 1970 Chevy C-10 and a 1965 Plymouth Satellite.

The festival kicked off Saturday morning with a parade at 9 a.m. Parade registration was free and hosted numerous organizations in the community. The people on the floats came ready to hand out candy and other small items, like Frisbees and T-shirts. Naturally, there were float goers armed with squirt guns ready to soak the crowd.

The carnival ran on Friday from 4-11 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. Discount tickets were available for purchase in advance at 50% off online or at the South Ogden City Hall and Macey’s grocery stores. Normal tickets cost $18 per 20 tickets.

“It was really great watching all of the kids running around, having fun and riding rides,” Kylie Grant, carnival attendee, said.

There were rides, games and a variety of food carts for attendees to experience. A favorite ride among the older crowd was The Gravitron, while the kiddos enjoyed the cool splash of the boat ride.

The festival also offered a water play area, complete with multiple inflatable water slides and water walking balls. The water play area charged $3 per trip down the slide and $5 for the water walking balls. However, an unlimited day pass was available for $10.

South Ogden Days wrapped up its festivities with a bang Saturday night with an Emerson Drive concert starting at 8:30 p.m. and firework show starting at 9:45 p.m.

If you missed out on the fun this year, South Ogden Days will be back again in June 2016 on the first day of summer. After all, their motto is “Summer Starts Here”.

The annual South Ogden Days festival took place this last weekend, June 16-22, at Friendship Park in South Ogden. It hosted a variety of events from a 5k run to a carnival.

“As a city, we are so grateful for all of the people that come out, the vendors and food guys. We couldn’t do much without them,” James F. Minster, South Ogden City Mayor, said. South Ogden Days attendance has grown from 5,000 to 20,000 people in the last five years.

The Rock N’ Rods Car and Motorcycle Show 2015 was held Friday, June 19th from 5-9 p.m. Treeo, a senior living facility new to the community, sponsored the car show.

“Treeo is new and very active in the community. We’re thankful to have them.” Jill Mccullough, Special Events Coordinator for South Ogden City, said.

The award ceremony for the car and motorcycle show was held at 8 p.m. with a raffle for all of the entries following. Raffle prizes included a lot of summer must-haves, such as a grill, coolers and camping chairs.

The major categories were picked by city officials. The Fire Chief’s choice was a 1965 Daytona Coupe, owned by Kellen Kerr. The Police Chief’s choice was Sherry Robins’ 1940 Coupe Deluxe. Finally, the Mayor’s choice was the 2008 Shelby GT 500 owned by Wes Goldsberry, and the sponsor’s choice was Dave Rowe’s 1930 Chevy Coupe.

Crowds enjoyed the many different cars that were on display at the South Ogden Carnival and Car Show. (Scott Stevens / The Signpost)

The minor categories included sweetest wheels, hottest ride and even best make-out backseat. A 1968 Camaro was voted for hottest ride while a 1930 Ford Model A won the best make-out backseat. Other winners included a 1951 Willys Jeepster, a 1970 Chevy C-10 and a 1965 Plymouth Satellite.

The festival kicked off Saturday morning with a parade at 9 a.m. Parade registration was free and hosted numerous organizations in the community. The people on the floats came ready to hand out candy and other small items, like Frisbees and T-shirts. Naturally, there were float goers armed with squirt guns ready to soak the crowd.

The carnival ran on Friday from 4-11 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. Discount tickets were available for purchase in advance at 50% off online or at the South Ogden City Hall and Macey’s grocery stores. Normal tickets cost $18 per 20 tickets.

“It was really great watching all of the kids running around, having fun and riding rides,” Kylie Grant, carnival attendee, said.

There were rides, games and a variety of food carts for attendees to experience. A favorite ride among the older crowd was The Gravitron, while the kiddos enjoyed the cool splash of the boat ride.

The festival also offered a water play area, complete with multiple inflatable water slides and water walking balls. The water play area charged $3 per trip down the slide and $5 for the water walking balls. However, an unlimited day pass was available for $10.

South Ogden Days wrapped up its festivities with a bang Saturday night with an Emerson Drive concert starting at 8:30 p.m. and firework show starting at 9:45 p.m.

If you missed out on the fun this year, South Ogden Days will be back again in June 2016 on the first day of summer. After all, their motto is “Summer Starts Here”.

Stringing everyday observations into clever synopses seems effortless for Australian singer/songwriter Courtney Barnett. The 26-year-old from Melbourne makes the obvious captivating. Her commentary on relationships and social norms run like a stream of consciousness—genuine and without punctuation.

Courtney Barnett at Sasquatch! 2015. Photo by Amber Zbitnoff

Courtney Barnett at Sasquatch! 2015. Photo by Amber Zbitnoff

Barnett livens her wit in psychedelic rock that hints of punk and folk influences. Though her lyric style could be argued as Dylan-esque, Barnett remains her own unique entity and perhaps one of the best lyricists of her generation.

“Avant Garderner,” listed on Barnett’s double EP “A Sea of Split Peas” released in 2013, is a compelling ride of humor expressed in the monotone of Monday. “I take a hit from my asthma puffer, I do it wrong, I was never good at smoking bongs.”

Barnett combined her first two EPs, each taking a year to complete, into “A Double EP: A Sea of Split Peas.”

“I didn’t want people to misinterpret it as an album,” she said in a 2013 interview with Pitchfork. “Doing these two EPs feels like good practice…I wouldn’t want it to be considered an album because it weirdly feels like a lie.”

The opening track “Out of the Woodwork” narrates double standards in relationships. Barnett doesn’t busy herself with the ambiguous; she appeals to the plain and familiar, and we’re all the better for it. “Do you know you’re not very good at listening, but you’re really good at saying everything on your mind.”  No song is without her satirical dialogue, especially the track “Anonymous Club.”

Barnett is unapologetic of her ambition to pack boxes in the basement of the post office, she confessed in an interview with Rolling Stone. It’s not surprising that she titled her debut LP “Sometimes I Sit and Think and Sometimes I Just Sit,” released in March, Barnett remains sharp and phlegmatic.

In “Pedestrian at Best,” Barnett turns money into origami. “I think you’re a joke, but I don’t find you very funny,” she says as she tries to lower the expectations of herself. The song is complemented with angsty vocals and old rock vibes with heavy guitar and drum riffs.

“Depreston” makes for different company. Soft acoustics that are almost beachy are contrasted with melancholic lyrics and dark satire.

Sticking to mundane topics, Barnett continues to add her own twist of intrigue—she is the voice of the small things we’ve lost sight of.

Stringing everyday observations into clever synopses seems effortless for Australian singer/songwriter Courtney Barnett. The 26-year-old from Melbourne makes the obvious captivating. Her commentary on relationships and social norms run like a stream of consciousness—genuine and without punctuation.

Courtney Barnett at Sasquatch! 2015. Photo by Amber Zbitnoff

Barnett livens her wit in psychedelic rock that hints of punk and folk influences. Though her lyric style could be argued as Dylan-esque, Barnett remains her own unique entity and perhaps one of the best lyricists of her generation.

“Avant Garderner,” listed on Barnett’s double EP “A Sea of Split Peas” released in 2013, is a compelling ride of humor expressed in the monotone of Monday. “I take a hit from my asthma puffer, I do it wrong, I was never good at smoking bongs.”

Barnett combined her first two EPs, each taking a year to complete, into “A Double EP: A Sea of Split Peas.”

“I didn’t want people to misinterpret it as an album,” she said in a 2013 interview with Pitchfork. “Doing these two EPs feels like good practice…I wouldn’t want it to be considered an album because it weirdly feels like a lie.”

The opening track “Out of the Woodwork” narrates double standards in relationships. Barnett doesn’t busy herself with the ambiguous; she appeals to the plain and familiar, and we’re all the better for it. “Do you know you’re not very good at listening, but you’re really good at saying everything on your mind.”  No song is without her satirical dialogue, especially the track “Anonymous Club.”

Barnett is unapologetic of her ambition to pack boxes in the basement of the post office, she confessed in an interview with Rolling Stone. It’s not surprising that she titled her debut LP “Sometimes I Sit and Think and Sometimes I Just Sit,” released in March, Barnett remains sharp and phlegmatic.

In “Pedestrian at Best,” Barnett turns money into origami. “I think you’re a joke, but I don’t find you very funny,” she says as she tries to lower the expectations of herself. The song is complemented with angsty vocals and old rock vibes with heavy guitar and drum riffs.

“Depreston” makes for different company. Soft acoustics that are almost beachy are contrasted with melancholic lyrics and dark satire.

Sticking to mundane topics, Barnett continues to add her own twist of intrigue—she is the voice of the small things we’ve lost sight of.

Hamartia performs at Save Mojos Ogden event on Sunday, June 21. (Emily Crooks / The Signpost)

Hamartia performs at the Save Mojos Ogden event on Sunday, June 21. (Emily Crooks / The Signpost)

In the week since a Facebook post announced that Mojos music venue could be shutting its doors, an outpouring of support has come from the community, including teens who call Mojos home.

Mojos put a long post on its Facebook page explaining that the building that houses the all-ages venue may be sold.

“We are reaching out to you and our beloved Mojos Ogden family and friends to help save the music downtown,” the post states. Mojos has served as a safe haven for teens who love music for the past 10 years and is the only all-ages live music venue in Ogden.

“It breaks my heart to see them so worried, concerned and sad,” owner Ron Atencio said as he talked about the outpouring of concern from fans. The night Atencio made the announcement about Mojos, some fans made handmade signs for an impromptu open mic night to help raise money.

“This is their home. They’re desperate,” he said. “The money is helpful, but it’s about knowing that these kids are trying their hardest to do something.”

The neighborhood in which Mojos sits is facing gentrification, and the owner has talked about selling the property. According to the Facebook post, the owner has been generous to Mojos the past decade by charging a relatively low rent, but the price to buy the space is too high, which is why Mojos is now asking the community for help.

Atencio says when he put the announcement on Facebook around 3 a.m. that morning, he received an immediate response. “I didn’t go to bed until about 6 because I was just watching it,” he said.Along with people sharing the event post, money started going into the GoFundMe account right away, and within 24 hours, about $1,500 was raised.

Advice of real estate agents, consultants, possible investors and many others has been sought. Atencio said some investors may end up buying the building and work out a deal with him, but nothing is settled yet.

“We’re trying to find where the fair market price value is, what the basis of reality is and what he [the owner] will accept,” Atencio said. “Once we start getting the bottom line numbers and bottom line negotiations, then I’ll have a better picture of where we’re at.”

Atencio said he was always expecting something like this to happen, but not as abruptly as it did.

More than concerts are at stake. If Mojos closes, there will be nowhere to house Mojos Art and Music Academy (MAMA). MAMA is a non-profit academy that provides affordable music and art lessons, mentoring and scholarships to youth in the Ogden area. The hope is to save Mojos so that this program can be housed in the building that so many teens already call home.

The idea is that MAMA would be on the upper level of the Mojos building and be an actual school. Atencio would like to set up grants and scholarships for students who can’t afford the classes.

“There are a lot of kids who have talent, and if we caught them at 6 or 8, could you imagine what it would do for the community?” Atencio said.

Atencio is weighing a few options for Mojos at this point. One is to purchase the building and renovate the upstairs for MAMA. Another is to secure a new lease with the current owner, despite the high price, and find more time to gather resources. Another option is to move to a new, larger location that would accommodate MAMA and more fans.

As a last resort, Mojos would simply shut down.

“I could do this anywhere,” Atencio said. “But this is the place.”

In order to keep the doors open, funds are needed from the community. Mojos has a GoFundMe account open that is currently asking for $10,000. This would make a down payment on the building if the goal was reached. If a deal cannot be struck, all of the money collected will be used for moving fees. As of June 20, $2,254 has been donated.

No matter the amounts raised by the community, Mojos will be closing July and possibly part of August to focus on getting things worked out. In an effort to collect more funds, the store next to Mojos will be used to sell antiques and other treasures from Ron’s collection to help achieve their goal.

The dates of the sales will be announced later this month. Atencio said he will have a better understanding of what will happen to Mojos by July 5.

On June 21, a concert was held to help raise funds and many community members showed up to enjoy the show. Aspen Rasmussen attended the concert and has been going to Mojos for the past three years. She works there and said Mojos was a good place for her to go.

“I love it here. It’s my life. It’s my home,” she said. If Mojos closes down, it will not only affect Rasmussen, but a lot of other people as well.

“Mojos keeps a lot of kids out of trouble,” she said. Because Mojos is an all-ages venue, teens are welcomed with open arms.

Similarly, Hanssell Tejeda said Mojos is phenomenal. He started attending Mojos for the “hardcore nights,” but began coming more frequently once he started working there. He also said that the community would be heavily affected if Mojos closed.

“After The Basement closed, it distracted people from music,” he said.

Mojos has served and loved Ogden for over a decade now and is asking for that love in return. “We will continue to help individuals in need, but need your help in return,” the Facebook post states. In addition to what Mojos has brought to the community, it has also provided something for Atencio as well.

“This gives me meaning to my life. This gives me purpose,” he said. Every night that Mojos is open is a special one, he said.

“I love these kids. I love these bands. That means I love thousands of people, but that’s how big my family is,” Atencio said.

Mojos is a unique place that has been a place for many to flourish within the past decade. Bands have become successful, and teens have had a safe place to be themselves. Because of this, Atencio says, Mojos isn’t going down without a fight.

“For me to just close up and walk away would be a heartbreak to me,” he said. “It’s something I’d have to live with the rest of my life, knowing that I took this away from the community.”

There are high hopes at the moment that things will work out for the venue, but until then the community will have to wait and see.

“Who knows how long it will take us to get this handled?” Atencio said.

 

Mojos holds shows with local musicians in effort to earn funding to keep the building. (Emily Crooks / The Signpost) Bird Watcher performs at Save Mojos Ogden event on Sunday, June 21. (Emily Crooks / The Signpost) Bird Watcher performs at Save Mojos Ogden event on Sunday, June 21. (Emily Crooks / The Signpost) Bird Watcher performs at Save Mojos Ogden event on Sunday, June 21. (Emily Crooks / The Signpost) Reiley Van Wagoner performs at Save Mojos Ogden event on Sunday, June 21. He has performed for Mojos for the past 10 years. (Emily Crooks / The Signpost) Hamartia performs at Save Mojos Ogden event on Sunday, June 21. (Emily Crooks / The Signpost) Cries of the Captive performs at Save Mojos Ogden event on Sunday, June 21. (Emily Crooks / The Signpost) Dethrone The Sovereign performs at Save Mojos Ogden event on Sunday, June 21. (Emily Crooks / The Signpost) Dethrone The Sovereign performs at Save Mojos Ogden event on Sunday, June 21. (Emily Crooks / The Signpost) Tyler Millaway, a local musician, has been a Mojos regular for the past two years. (Emily Crooks / The Signpost) Geoffrey Bilderback is a passionate employee at Mojos who hopes he will continue working. (Emily Crooks / The Signpost) Geoffrey Bilderback is a passionate employee at Mojos who hopes he will continue working. (Emily Crooks / The Signpost) Mojos has been a home to many, including this beloved pup Jolie. (Emily Crooks / The Signpost) Shannon Millar is one of the young artists who often performs on Thursday's open mic nights at Mojos. Miller started performing at Mojos at the age of 10. (Emily Crooks / The Signpost) Mojos has been a place for those of all ages to express themselves through music or poetry. They also come to simply hang out, spend time with friends and meet knew people. (Emily Crooks / The Signpost) Mojos, both inside and out, is a collection of artworks and memories. (Emily Crooks / The Signpost) Mojos, both inside and out, is a collection of artworks and memories. (Emily Crooks / The Signpost) Mojos, both inside and out, is a collection of artworks and memories. (Emily Crooks / The Signpost)

Hamartia performs at the Save Mojos Ogden event on Sunday, June 21. (Emily Crooks / The Signpost)

In the week since a Facebook post announced that Mojos music venue could be shutting its doors, an outpouring of support has come from the community, including teens who call Mojos home.

Mojos put a long post on its Facebook page explaining that the building that houses the all-ages venue may be sold.

“We are reaching out to you and our beloved Mojos Ogden family and friends to help save the music downtown,” the post states. Mojos has served as a safe haven for teens who love music for the past 10 years and is the only all-ages live music venue in Ogden.

“It breaks my heart to see them so worried, concerned and sad,” owner Ron Atencio said as he talked about the outpouring of concern from fans. The night Atencio made the announcement about Mojos, some fans made handmade signs for an impromptu open mic night to help raise money.

“This is their home. They’re desperate,” he said. “The money is helpful, but it’s about knowing that these kids are trying their hardest to do something.”

The neighborhood in which Mojos sits is facing gentrification, and the owner has talked about selling the property. According to the Facebook post, the owner has been generous to Mojos the past decade by charging a relatively low rent, but the price to buy the space is too high, which is why Mojos is now asking the community for help.

Atencio says when he put the announcement on Facebook around 3 a.m. that morning, he received an immediate response. “I didn’t go to bed until about 6 because I was just watching it,” he said.Along with people sharing the event post, money started going into the GoFundMe account right away, and within 24 hours, about $1,500 was raised.

Advice of real estate agents, consultants, possible investors and many others has been sought. Atencio said some investors may end up buying the building and work out a deal with him, but nothing is settled yet.

“We’re trying to find where the fair market price value is, what the basis of reality is and what he [the owner] will accept,” Atencio said. “Once we start getting the bottom line numbers and bottom line negotiations, then I’ll have a better picture of where we’re at.”

Atencio said he was always expecting something like this to happen, but not as abruptly as it did.

More than concerts are at stake. If Mojos closes, there will be nowhere to house Mojos Art and Music Academy (MAMA). MAMA is a non-profit academy that provides affordable music and art lessons, mentoring and scholarships to youth in the Ogden area. The hope is to save Mojos so that this program can be housed in the building that so many teens already call home.

The idea is that MAMA would be on the upper level of the Mojos building and be an actual school. Atencio would like to set up grants and scholarships for students who can’t afford the classes.

“There are a lot of kids who have talent, and if we caught them at 6 or 8, could you imagine what it would do for the community?” Atencio said.

Atencio is weighing a few options for Mojos at this point. One is to purchase the building and renovate the upstairs for MAMA. Another is to secure a new lease with the current owner, despite the high price, and find more time to gather resources. Another option is to move to a new, larger location that would accommodate MAMA and more fans.

As a last resort, Mojos would simply shut down.

“I could do this anywhere,” Atencio said. “But this is the place.”

In order to keep the doors open, funds are needed from the community. Mojos has a GoFundMe account open that is currently asking for $10,000. This would make a down payment on the building if the goal was reached. If a deal cannot be struck, all of the money collected will be used for moving fees. As of June 20, $2,254 has been donated.

No matter the amounts raised by the community, Mojos will be closing July and possibly part of August to focus on getting things worked out. In an effort to collect more funds, the store next to Mojos will be used to sell antiques and other treasures from Ron’s collection to help achieve their goal.

The dates of the sales will be announced later this month. Atencio said he will have a better understanding of what will happen to Mojos by July 5.

On June 21, a concert was held to help raise funds and many community members showed up to enjoy the show. Aspen Rasmussen attended the concert and has been going to Mojos for the past three years. She works there and said Mojos was a good place for her to go.

“I love it here. It’s my life. It’s my home,” she said. If Mojos closes down, it will not only affect Rasmussen, but a lot of other people as well.

“Mojos keeps a lot of kids out of trouble,” she said. Because Mojos is an all-ages venue, teens are welcomed with open arms.

Similarly, Hanssell Tejeda said Mojos is phenomenal. He started attending Mojos for the “hardcore nights,” but began coming more frequently once he started working there. He also said that the community would be heavily affected if Mojos closed.

“After The Basement closed, it distracted people from music,” he said.

Mojos has served and loved Ogden for over a decade now and is asking for that love in return. “We will continue to help individuals in need, but need your help in return,” the Facebook post states. In addition to what Mojos has brought to the community, it has also provided something for Atencio as well.

“This gives me meaning to my life. This gives me purpose,” he said. Every night that Mojos is open is a special one, he said.

“I love these kids. I love these bands. That means I love thousands of people, but that’s how big my family is,” Atencio said.

Mojos is a unique place that has been a place for many to flourish within the past decade. Bands have become successful, and teens have had a safe place to be themselves. Because of this, Atencio says, Mojos isn’t going down without a fight.

“For me to just close up and walk away would be a heartbreak to me,” he said. “It’s something I’d have to live with the rest of my life, knowing that I took this away from the community.”

There are high hopes at the moment that things will work out for the venue, but until then the community will have to wait and see.

“Who knows how long it will take us to get this handled?” Atencio said.

 





















Versatile and capable, Dead Sara has been climbing the rungs of popularity for some time now. Foo Fighters’ Dave Grohl has even said, “Dead Sara should be the next biggest rock band in the world.”

The band’s latest album, “Pleasure to Meet You,” was released in March and will be the focal point of the band’s West Coast tour. Salt Lake City, on July 10 at In the Venue, is the first of nine stops on the tour, and the California rockers won’t hold anything back.

Emily Armstrong and Siouxsie Medley are the group’s dynamic duo. With Armstrong’s powerful and skilled vocals and Medley’s monster guitar riffs, Dead Sara is a supercharged group. Joined by Sean Friday and Chris Null, the four-piece band is electrifying.

“Pleasure to Meet You” has already had some success. The band has made two music videos with songs from the album and plays songs from previous tours with a good response.

Armstrong is excited for this West Coast tour. “I love being on the road,” she said.

Medley added, “The response has been great. It’s always really great to be in new cities with the new album, with people singing back. It’s great, and I’m excited to go out again.”

Because Salt Lake is the first stop on the short tour, fans can expect high energy. Medley and Armstrong also have high expectations from fans in Salt Lake.

“They’re crazy, and I like that,” Armstrong said. “It’s always a pleasure playing out there. It’s a good start.”

Salt Lake crowds have a good energy, she said. “They [the fans] don’t just stand around.”

When it came to writing the album, Medley and Armstrong said it’s more cohesive and connected than their previous self-titled album from 2012.

“We packed up all of our gear and went to a house in Malibu and dialed it in, and it was awesome,” Medley said. “It’s a whole new experience sitting in a house like it’s a studio.”

Medley commented that the group was looking for a different and new sound. “It was really hard but really fun,” she said.

“Pleasure to Meet You” is an 11-track album that has an old-time feel. Armstrong and Medley say that some of their favorites are “Radio One Two,” “For You I Am” and “Lovesick.”

This album, compared to their previous work, is more cohesive. “We’ve really come together as a team and as a band,” Medley said. “You can really tell how well we play together and how many years of touring we have under our belt that it’s more of an ‘us’ album.”

The writing process is different for many, but Armstrong talks about how, for them, just jamming out can result in something great.

“Somebody comes up with something, and we inspire each other by what we throw in,” she said. “It’s fun, you know?”

For this tour, Dead Sara is being joined by fellow rockers Lost in Society. The New Jersey-based group has a reputation that parallels punk acts like Rise against and Green Day, according to their website.

The two bands have a good relationship and will produce a great show. “We’ve known them for a bit,” Armstrong said. They are all great friends and are excited for the shows, Medley added.

Although the band hasn’t quite started rehearsing for the tour yet, Armstrong says that they may bring out some other songs that aren’t on their albums.

“We may throw in a few. We’ll see how it feels on the road. Nothing is set in stone yet, but it’s highly likely,” she said.

 

Versatile and capable, Dead Sara has been climbing the rungs of popularity for some time now. Foo Fighters’ Dave Grohl has even said, “Dead Sara should be the next biggest rock band in the world.”

The band’s latest album, “Pleasure to Meet You,” was released in March and will be the focal point of the band’s West Coast tour. Salt Lake City, on July 10 at In the Venue, is the first of nine stops on the tour, and the California rockers won’t hold anything back.

Emily Armstrong and Siouxsie Medley are the group’s dynamic duo. With Armstrong’s powerful and skilled vocals and Medley’s monster guitar riffs, Dead Sara is a supercharged group. Joined by Sean Friday and Chris Null, the four-piece band is electrifying.

“Pleasure to Meet You” has already had some success. The band has made two music videos with songs from the album and plays songs from previous tours with a good response.

Armstrong is excited for this West Coast tour. “I love being on the road,” she said.

Medley added, “The response has been great. It’s always really great to be in new cities with the new album, with people singing back. It’s great, and I’m excited to go out again.”

Because Salt Lake is the first stop on the short tour, fans can expect high energy. Medley and Armstrong also have high expectations from fans in Salt Lake.

“They’re crazy, and I like that,” Armstrong said. “It’s always a pleasure playing out there. It’s a good start.”

Salt Lake crowds have a good energy, she said. “They [the fans] don’t just stand around.”

When it came to writing the album, Medley and Armstrong said it’s more cohesive and connected than their previous self-titled album from 2012.

“We packed up all of our gear and went to a house in Malibu and dialed it in, and it was awesome,” Medley said. “It’s a whole new experience sitting in a house like it’s a studio.”

Medley commented that the group was looking for a different and new sound. “It was really hard but really fun,” she said.

“Pleasure to Meet You” is an 11-track album that has an old-time feel. Armstrong and Medley say that some of their favorites are “Radio One Two,” “For You I Am” and “Lovesick.”

This album, compared to their previous work, is more cohesive. “We’ve really come together as a team and as a band,” Medley said. “You can really tell how well we play together and how many years of touring we have under our belt that it’s more of an ‘us’ album.”

The writing process is different for many, but Armstrong talks about how, for them, just jamming out can result in something great.

“Somebody comes up with something, and we inspire each other by what we throw in,” she said. “It’s fun, you know?”

For this tour, Dead Sara is being joined by fellow rockers Lost in Society. The New Jersey-based group has a reputation that parallels punk acts like Rise against and Green Day, according to their website.

The two bands have a good relationship and will produce a great show. “We’ve known them for a bit,” Armstrong said. They are all great friends and are excited for the shows, Medley added.

Although the band hasn’t quite started rehearsing for the tour yet, Armstrong says that they may bring out some other songs that aren’t on their albums.

“We may throw in a few. We’ll see how it feels on the road. Nothing is set in stone yet, but it’s highly likely,” she said.

 

With the current success of “Les Miserables” and “Into the Woods,” it’s clear that musicals are widely loved. We crave the sweeping scores, relatable characters and romantic ballads. While there have been many great musicals throughout history, these five have stayed with us and always will.

5. ‘Wicked’ (2003):

Based on the fantastic Gregory Maguire novel of the same title, we finally see the origins of Elphaba. Idina Menzel and Kristin Chenoweth gave us perfect chemistry of two girls who, at first, disdain one another, then end up becoming close friends. We see the Emerald City in its shining glory, as well as a woman who just wanted to fit in.

Poster for the 2003 musical

4. ‘Aida’ (2000):

Before my high school, Layton High, did this musical in 2006, I hadn’t heard of this Elton John and Tim Rice production, but I was blown away. Adapted from the rousing Verdi opera, it tells the story of Radames falling in love with the Nubian princess Aida, who he brought back to Egypt as a slave. Elton’s flawless talent with writing lyrics give this story new life for modern audiences. The original cast of Adam Pascal, Heather Headley and Sherie Renee Scott is a perfect trio of a forbidden love triangle.

Fate will collide in Egypt.

3. ‘Phantom of the Opera’ (1986):

When I was 14, my grandfather told me I should listen to this iconic musical. I gave it a listen after seeing Michael Crawford’s name attached to the show. He and Sarah Brightman, in her younger years, are married well to this romantic musical. There are songs that you can’t get out of your head, no matter how hard you try. Crawford is perfect as the title character, drawing from the depths of his soul to portray a complex and passionate man. If you want to keep singing “Music of the Night” and “Masquerade,” check out this enduring musical.

Original theater poster for the 1986 musical

2. ‘The Scarlet Pimpernel’ (1997):

For those who love the 1980’s film version of this story with Anthony Andrews, look no further. This Frank Wildhorn musical contains all the humor and romance of the film. Douglas Sills is THE Scarlet Pimpernel, with his flamboyant mannerisms and soaring tenor voice. There’s also Terrence Mann as Chauvelin, whose voice is seductive and a powerful contrast to Sills. “The Creation of Man” is the highlight track and will make any listener laugh and smile.

Enticing, is it not?

1. ‘Jekyll and Hyde’ (1994):

Not what you’d expect? It’s the truth. This musical, inspired by the Robert Louis Stevenson story, stands above the rest. But which version is the best? Any true fan, like myself, would argue that the 1994 studio recording sinks its teeth into any listener.

Anthony Warlow as Jekyll/Hyde has given the top performance in musical history(especially considering that this was recorded right before he was diagnosed with Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma). You hear and feel throughout his performance a fierceness and vulnerability in a man who goes too far. Even the raw, animalistic sounds he makes will make your skin crawl. The fantastic Linda Eder as Lucy also stands out in this London musical, especially in “Bring on the Men.” Sadly, most of these songs haven’t been used in later versions. But this golden treasure—full of violence, danger, desire and ultimate tragedy—is a damn good cautionary tale. Prepare to be blown away.

Creepy and foreboding…

These five musicals offer adventure to musical aficionados and new music seekers alike. While the film versions of most of these are still not available, they’re truly remarkable nonetheless.  From the World of Oz to Egypt, these modern musicals stand above the trend of making films into musicals. These were on Broadway first, and they’ll always be up there with the best that the musical world has to offer.

With the current success of “Les Miserables” and “Into the Woods,” it’s clear that musicals are widely loved. We crave the sweeping scores, relatable characters and romantic ballads. While there have been many great musicals throughout history, these five have stayed with us and always will.

5. ‘Wicked’ (2003):

Based on the fantastic Gregory Maguire novel of the same title, we finally see the origins of Elphaba. Idina Menzel and Kristin Chenoweth gave us perfect chemistry of two girls who, at first, disdain one another, then end up becoming close friends. We see the Emerald City in its shining glory, as well as a woman who just wanted to fit in.

Poster for the 2003 musical

4. ‘Aida’ (2000):

Before my high school, Layton High, did this musical in 2006, I hadn’t heard of this Elton John and Tim Rice production, but I was blown away. Adapted from the rousing Verdi opera, it tells the story of Radames falling in love with the Nubian princess Aida, who he brought back to Egypt as a slave. Elton’s flawless talent with writing lyrics give this story new life for modern audiences. The original cast of Adam Pascal, Heather Headley and Sherie Renee Scott is a perfect trio of a forbidden love triangle.

Fate will collide in Egypt.

3. ‘Phantom of the Opera’ (1986):

When I was 14, my grandfather told me I should listen to this iconic musical. I gave it a listen after seeing Michael Crawford’s name attached to the show. He and Sarah Brightman, in her younger years, are married well to this romantic musical. There are songs that you can’t get out of your head, no matter how hard you try. Crawford is perfect as the title character, drawing from the depths of his soul to portray a complex and passionate man. If you want to keep singing “Music of the Night” and “Masquerade,” check out this enduring musical.

Original theater poster for the 1986 musical

2. ‘The Scarlet Pimpernel’ (1997):

For those who love the 1980’s film version of this story with Anthony Andrews, look no further. This Frank Wildhorn musical contains all the humor and romance of the film. Douglas Sills is THE Scarlet Pimpernel, with his flamboyant mannerisms and soaring tenor voice. There’s also Terrence Mann as Chauvelin, whose voice is seductive and a powerful contrast to Sills. “The Creation of Man” is the highlight track and will make any listener laugh and smile.

Enticing, is it not?

1. ‘Jekyll and Hyde’ (1994):

Not what you’d expect? It’s the truth. This musical, inspired by the Robert Louis Stevenson story, stands above the rest. But which version is the best? Any true fan, like myself, would argue that the 1994 studio recording sinks its teeth into any listener.

Anthony Warlow as Jekyll/Hyde has given the top performance in musical history(especially considering that this was recorded right before he was diagnosed with Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma). You hear and feel throughout his performance a fierceness and vulnerability in a man who goes too far. Even the raw, animalistic sounds he makes will make your skin crawl. The fantastic Linda Eder as Lucy also stands out in this London musical, especially in “Bring on the Men.” Sadly, most of these songs haven’t been used in later versions. But this golden treasure—full of violence, danger, desire and ultimate tragedy—is a damn good cautionary tale. Prepare to be blown away.

Creepy and foreboding…

These five musicals offer adventure to musical aficionados and new music seekers alike. While the film versions of most of these are still not available, they’re truly remarkable nonetheless.  From the World of Oz to Egypt, these modern musicals stand above the trend of making films into musicals. These were on Broadway first, and they’ll always be up there with the best that the musical world has to offer.

(Emily Crooks/ The Signpost)

West Side Story’s choreographer Talese Hunt poses with members of the cast. The Ziegfeld Theater’s opening night for the musical drama was Friday, June 5. (Emily Crooks/ The Signpost)

Walking into the darkened Ziegfeld Theater, the music of Leonard Bernstein’s “Cool” from West Side Story sings through the air.  Onstage, The Jets writhe in anger and pulse with hurt. When the number closes, the performers hold their final pose and then collapse in unstaged exhaustion.  A five-foot nine-inch, feminine silhouette rises from the front seats and calls out encouragement, thanks the actors for a long Saturday of rehearsals, corrects mistakes, clarifies counting but mostly she calls out for more.  More hurt, more anger, more pain, and more emotion.  The performers are tired, but they manage to smile and nod affirmatively that they are willing to give more for their choreographer, Talese Hunt.

Miss Hunt began talking about dancing and smiles and tells that she began when she was three. She’s grown a bit since then. In fact, she laughs about being 5’9”and a dancer, saying “People always think it’s good to be tall as a dancer, but, in my opinion, now having lived the life of a tall dancer, I feel there’s fewer jobs for the taller dancers.” Hunt’s five-foot-nine-inch frame often was a stumbling block because of casting issues and her needing to be partnered with male dancers who were taller than her. This limited her choices to some degree but had people telling her to look east to New York City and the Radio City Music Hall Rockettes, who are famous for their height requirements of five-foot six-inches to five-foot-10-and-a-half-inches.

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The Ziegfeld Theater’s West Side Story features a talented cast. The theater’s opening night for the musical drama was Friday, June 5. (Emily Crooks/ The Signpost)

“I’m tall!”  Hunt says almost apologetically but with a hint of defiance, but that height has led her to reach higher and for more.  One might consider coming from the Rockettes to Ogden might be a step down, but Hunt doesn’t think so. “The reason that I loved working at the Ziegfeld as compared to a show like the Rockettes is that this is a living, breathing production.” After five seasons with the Rockettes, Hunt decided to stay in the Wasatch Front and continue dancing closer to home, believing that Utah has a history of supporting the arts.

The Rockettes, in their three month contracts, are about having to get things done. They only have so much money, so they have to save it. The show is set, and as a dancer, you don’t have as much creative freedom.  Here, in community theater, Hunt feels more free to create, and getting to do it with friends and neighbors, seeing them shine in ways that maybe they don’t get to do in their day jobs, is very fulfilling. Her first show at the Ziegfeld Theater, on 40th and Washington in Ogden, was as Ulla in the 2014 cast of “The Producers” where she first met Morgan Parry, the director of West Side Story.   The friendship formed there brought Talese back to Ogden this year to choreograph West Side Story.

Daniel Pack is dangled upside down by other cast members in West Side Story. The Ziegfeld Theater's opening night for the musical drama was Friday, June 5. (Emily Crooks/ The Signpost)

Daniel Pack is dangled upside down by other cast members in West Side Story. The Ziegfeld Theater’s opening night for the musical drama was Friday, June 5. (Emily Crooks/ The Signpost)

West Side Story, a modern retelling of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, has, from the beginning, told its story not only through dialogue and singing but through dance, as well.  In its opening year on Broadway in 1957, West Side Story was nominated for six Tony Awards, including best musical.  Losing to Meredith Wilson’s The Music Man for Best Musical, Director/Choreographer, Jerome Robbins won a Tony for choreography. This history of excellence in choreography as well as the musical score by Bernstein can be a daunting task from a choreographer’s perspective.

When brought on by Morgan Parry, Miss Hunt says Parry told her that she wanted to take the dance to new heights.  The fight scenes needed to feel raw and real and fit to the music.  Jerome Robbin’s original choreography is so iconic that leaving it behind would be noticed by an audience.  The two ladies, Parry and Hunt, also wanted to bring more levels into the dance and make use of a fire escape built into the set, a scaffolding that moves, a water tower and a moveable metal staircase.

Talese feels lucky that she was able to get so many acrobatic dancers for the cast, especially in the men. Daniel Pack, who plays the Jet gang member, A-rab, is a student in Weber State’s music department.  Pack says that sometimes he feels a bit intimidated by some of the more experienced dancers and acrobats in the cast, but, working with Hunt, he’s been pushed to do many things he never thought he would. “She [Hunt] doesn’t have unrealistic expectations of us; she just has high expectations of us.” Those high expectations led his character to be dangled upside-down by his legs from a scaffolding by rival gang members, the Sharks, in the opening scene of the musical.

You can see the results of Talese Hunt and Morgan Parry’s collaboration,  in West Side Story at the Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 S Washington Bvld, Ogden.  Opening night was Friday, June 5 at 7:30 p.m. Regular performances are 7:30 p.m. every Friday and Saturday, with two 2:00 p.m. matinees on Saturdays, June 20 and 27.  More information can be found at zigarts.com

West Side Story’s choreographer Talese Hunt poses with members of the cast. The Ziegfeld Theater’s opening night for the musical drama was Friday, June 5. (Emily Crooks/ The Signpost)

Walking into the darkened Ziegfeld Theater, the music of Leonard Bernstein’s “Cool” from West Side Story sings through the air.  Onstage, The Jets writhe in anger and pulse with hurt. When the number closes, the performers hold their final pose and then collapse in unstaged exhaustion.  A five-foot nine-inch, feminine silhouette rises from the front seats and calls out encouragement, thanks the actors for a long Saturday of rehearsals, corrects mistakes, clarifies counting but mostly she calls out for more.  More hurt, more anger, more pain, and more emotion.  The performers are tired, but they manage to smile and nod affirmatively that they are willing to give more for their choreographer, Talese Hunt.

Miss Hunt began talking about dancing and smiles and tells that she began when she was three. She’s grown a bit since then. In fact, she laughs about being 5’9”and a dancer, saying “People always think it’s good to be tall as a dancer, but, in my opinion, now having lived the life of a tall dancer, I feel there’s fewer jobs for the taller dancers.” Hunt’s five-foot-nine-inch frame often was a stumbling block because of casting issues and her needing to be partnered with male dancers who were taller than her. This limited her choices to some degree but had people telling her to look east to New York City and the Radio City Music Hall Rockettes, who are famous for their height requirements of five-foot six-inches to five-foot-10-and-a-half-inches.

The Ziegfeld Theater’s West Side Story features a talented cast. The theater’s opening night for the musical drama was Friday, June 5. (Emily Crooks/ The Signpost)

“I’m tall!”  Hunt says almost apologetically but with a hint of defiance, but that height has led her to reach higher and for more.  One might consider coming from the Rockettes to Ogden might be a step down, but Hunt doesn’t think so. “The reason that I loved working at the Ziegfeld as compared to a show like the Rockettes is that this is a living, breathing production.” After five seasons with the Rockettes, Hunt decided to stay in the Wasatch Front and continue dancing closer to home, believing that Utah has a history of supporting the arts.

The Rockettes, in their three month contracts, are about having to get things done. They only have so much money, so they have to save it. The show is set, and as a dancer, you don’t have as much creative freedom.  Here, in community theater, Hunt feels more free to create, and getting to do it with friends and neighbors, seeing them shine in ways that maybe they don’t get to do in their day jobs, is very fulfilling. Her first show at the Ziegfeld Theater, on 40th and Washington in Ogden, was as Ulla in the 2014 cast of “The Producers” where she first met Morgan Parry, the director of West Side Story.   The friendship formed there brought Talese back to Ogden this year to choreograph West Side Story.

Daniel Pack is dangled upside down by other cast members in West Side Story. The Ziegfeld Theater’s opening night for the musical drama was Friday, June 5. (Emily Crooks/ The Signpost)

West Side Story, a modern retelling of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, has, from the beginning, told its story not only through dialogue and singing but through dance, as well.  In its opening year on Broadway in 1957, West Side Story was nominated for six Tony Awards, including best musical.  Losing to Meredith Wilson’s The Music Man for Best Musical, Director/Choreographer, Jerome Robbins won a Tony for choreography. This history of excellence in choreography as well as the musical score by Bernstein can be a daunting task from a choreographer’s perspective.

When brought on by Morgan Parry, Miss Hunt says Parry told her that she wanted to take the dance to new heights.  The fight scenes needed to feel raw and real and fit to the music.  Jerome Robbin’s original choreography is so iconic that leaving it behind would be noticed by an audience.  The two ladies, Parry and Hunt, also wanted to bring more levels into the dance and make use of a fire escape built into the set, a scaffolding that moves, a water tower and a moveable metal staircase.

Talese feels lucky that she was able to get so many acrobatic dancers for the cast, especially in the men. Daniel Pack, who plays the Jet gang member, A-rab, is a student in Weber State’s music department.  Pack says that sometimes he feels a bit intimidated by some of the more experienced dancers and acrobats in the cast, but, working with Hunt, he’s been pushed to do many things he never thought he would. “She [Hunt] doesn’t have unrealistic expectations of us; she just has high expectations of us.” Those high expectations led his character to be dangled upside-down by his legs from a scaffolding by rival gang members, the Sharks, in the opening scene of the musical.

You can see the results of Talese Hunt and Morgan Parry’s collaboration,  in West Side Story at the Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 S Washington Bvld, Ogden.  Opening night was Friday, June 5 at 7:30 p.m. Regular performances are 7:30 p.m. every Friday and Saturday, with two 2:00 p.m. matinees on Saturdays, June 20 and 27.  More information can be found at zigarts.com

It has “Nothing to do With Love.” Halestorm is just amazing. Whether they are performing a hit song from the past or are playing a song from their new album, Halestorm never disappoints. With a heavy sound and a loyal fan base, they are a “Familiar Taste of Poison.” I could quote song titles all day, but you really should listen to them yourself.

The popularity of the band Halestorm has been steadily rising since their formation in the late 90’s by brother and sister duo Lzzy and Arejay Hale. The band has seen many successes in the past few years, and nothing is stopping them from becoming rock and roll legends.

From Red Lion, Pennsylvania, the band consists of vocalist Lzzy Hale, guitarist Joe Hottinger, drummer Arejay Hale and bassist Josh Smith. Their self-titled debut album took the world by “storm” in 2009 through Atlantic Records, enticing rock fans.

Lzzy’s powerful vocals and the band’s overall chemistry makes fans want to come back for more, and their versatility and ability to constantly produce good albums grows their popularity exponentially.

Halestorm performing one of their hit songs in Magna, Utah. (Emilee Atkinson/ The Signpost)

Halestorm performing one of their hit songs in Magna, Utah. (Emilee Atkinson/ The Signpost)

Halestorm’s self-titled album released in 2009 is all about love and the frustrating pain that can come with it.

Tracks like “Innocence” and “What Were You Expecting” are anti-love songs that you want to sing right after a break up. At the same time, one of the most popular tracks on this album “It’s Not You” sends a message of being in love but not with the person the song speaks to.

Later in 2011, Halestorm released their second album, “The Strange Case Of…” which made previous fans have a more deeply rooted love for the band, while recruiting new Storm Chasers, or Halestorm fans.

The last song on the album entitled “Here’s to Us” gave fans a way to connect with the band on a deeper level. The song talks about giving cheers to your friends, remembering rough times and anticipating what’s ahead. The song is a staple for the band and is played at nearly every show.

While Halestorm is able to produce amazing music of their own, they are able to bring new life to older songs in their two cover albums. The band has revitalized songs from Fleetwood Mac as well as Pat Benatar. They also bring new sound to more recent songs like “Get Lucky” by Daft Punk and “1996” by Marilyn Manson.

Lzzy Hale rocking out with the crowd on June 3rd (Emilee Atkinson/ The Signpost)

Lzzy Hale rocking out with the crowd on June 3rd (Emilee Atkinson/ The Signpost)

Whether Halestorm is covering a classic or producing their own sound, it’s safe to say they rock just about anything.

The band’s latest album, Into the Wild Life, was just recently released and was highly anticipated by the Storm Chaser community. The band launched the long-awaited album in March and have been performing the new songs across the country.

The best part about this band is the fact that they are so appreciative of their fans. They always take the time to tell their fans how much they mean to them and how the fans are a big part of what they do.

Meeting Halestorm is one of the best experiences I’ve ever had. Each band member introduces themselves and interacts with you as if they’ve known you forever. They are personable and so down to earth that it’s easy to talk to them.

I’ve had the pleasure of seeing Halestorm three times in the past few years, and each time has been an amazing experience. They have the ability to always give fans the best experience possible.

Joe Hottinger of Halestorm performing a solo during last Wednesday's show. (Emilee Atkinson/ The Signpost)

Joe Hottinger of Halestorm performing a solo during their June 3rd show.(Emilee Atkinson/ The Signpost)

 

It has “Nothing to do With Love.” Halestorm is just amazing. Whether they are performing a hit song from the past or are playing a song from their new album, Halestorm never disappoints. With a heavy sound and a loyal fan base, they are a “Familiar Taste of Poison.” I could quote song titles all day, but you really should listen to them yourself.

The popularity of the band Halestorm has been steadily rising since their formation in the late 90’s by brother and sister duo Lzzy and Arejay Hale. The band has seen many successes in the past few years, and nothing is stopping them from becoming rock and roll legends.

From Red Lion, Pennsylvania, the band consists of vocalist Lzzy Hale, guitarist Joe Hottinger, drummer Arejay Hale and bassist Josh Smith. Their self-titled debut album took the world by “storm” in 2009 through Atlantic Records, enticing rock fans.

Lzzy’s powerful vocals and the band’s overall chemistry makes fans want to come back for more, and their versatility and ability to constantly produce good albums grows their popularity exponentially.

Halestorm performing one of their hit songs in Magna, Utah.
(Emilee Atkinson/ The Signpost)

Halestorm’s self-titled album released in 2009 is all about love and the frustrating pain that can come with it.

Tracks like “Innocence” and “What Were You Expecting” are anti-love songs that you want to sing right after a break up. At the same time, one of the most popular tracks on this album “It’s Not You” sends a message of being in love but not with the person the song speaks to.

Later in 2011, Halestorm released their second album, “The Strange Case Of…” which made previous fans have a more deeply rooted love for the band, while recruiting new Storm Chasers, or Halestorm fans.

The last song on the album entitled “Here’s to Us” gave fans a way to connect with the band on a deeper level. The song talks about giving cheers to your friends, remembering rough times and anticipating what’s ahead. The song is a staple for the band and is played at nearly every show.

While Halestorm is able to produce amazing music of their own, they are able to bring new life to older songs in their two cover albums. The band has revitalized songs from Fleetwood Mac as well as Pat Benatar. They also bring new sound to more recent songs like “Get Lucky” by Daft Punk and “1996” by Marilyn Manson.

Lzzy Hale rocking out with the crowd on June 3rd
(Emilee Atkinson/ The Signpost)

Whether Halestorm is covering a classic or producing their own sound, it’s safe to say they rock just about anything.

The band’s latest album, Into the Wild Life, was just recently released and was highly anticipated by the Storm Chaser community. The band launched the long-awaited album in March and have been performing the new songs across the country.

The best part about this band is the fact that they are so appreciative of their fans. They always take the time to tell their fans how much they mean to them and how the fans are a big part of what they do.

Meeting Halestorm is one of the best experiences I’ve ever had. Each band member introduces themselves and interacts with you as if they’ve known you forever. They are personable and so down to earth that it’s easy to talk to them.

I’ve had the pleasure of seeing Halestorm three times in the past few years, and each time has been an amazing experience. They have the ability to always give fans the best experience possible.

Joe Hottinger of Halestorm performing a solo during their June 3rd show.
(Emilee Atkinson/ The Signpost)

 

Circa Waves offers their debut album "Young Chasers" to indie fans.

Circa Waves offers their debut album “Young Chasers.”

All the way from Liverpool, England, Circa Waves brings their debut album “Young Chasers” to the US. Formed in 2013, the Indie Rock band is currently celebrating the release of their album with a European tour. The band gained some attention in March 2014 when they opened the New Music Express Awards, an annual music awards show in the United Kingdom.

Circa Waves is a band that epitomizes what indie rock sounds like. The band achieves a great sound, while reaching out to fans with their lyrics. Songs like “Stuck in My Teeth,” “T-Shirt Weather” and “Young Chasers” offer a lot of enjoyment to listeners.

The song that sticks out the most is “T-Shirt Weather.” It makes the listener feel nostalgic for long summer days and having a great time. The song has great instrumental elements that add to the lyrics to create longing feelings for the season.

“Stuck in My Teeth” is another song to look out for. “I’m a little too young with not enough time,” is the main line of the song and gives young people something to relate to.

“Young Chasers,” the song for which the album is named also offers great elements. This song is packed with energy and once again speaks to the young crowd. The combination of great vocals and instruments will make listeners want to put the song on repeat.

If you are looking for bands similar to Circa Wave, try Swim Deep, Wolf Alice and Lonely The Brave. This debut album gets four out of five stars because the group is a good example of what indie music is. Fans of the genre can rejoice in the sound of Circa Waves.

 

Circa Waves offers their debut album “Young Chasers.”

All the way from Liverpool, England, Circa Waves brings their debut album “Young Chasers” to the US. Formed in 2013, the Indie Rock band is currently celebrating the release of their album with a European tour. The band gained some attention in March 2014 when they opened the New Music Express Awards, an annual music awards show in the United Kingdom.

Circa Waves is a band that epitomizes what indie rock sounds like. The band achieves a great sound, while reaching out to fans with their lyrics. Songs like “Stuck in My Teeth,” “T-Shirt Weather” and “Young Chasers” offer a lot of enjoyment to listeners.

The song that sticks out the most is “T-Shirt Weather.” It makes the listener feel nostalgic for long summer days and having a great time. The song has great instrumental elements that add to the lyrics to create longing feelings for the season.

“Stuck in My Teeth” is another song to look out for. “I’m a little too young with not enough time,” is the main line of the song and gives young people something to relate to.

“Young Chasers,” the song for which the album is named also offers great elements. This song is packed with energy and once again speaks to the young crowd. The combination of great vocals and instruments will make listeners want to put the song on repeat.

If you are looking for bands similar to Circa Wave, try Swim Deep, Wolf Alice and Lonely The Brave. This debut album gets four out of five stars because the group is a good example of what indie music is. Fans of the genre can rejoice in the sound of Circa Waves.

 

There are dozens of venues in Salt Lake City where you can see concerts. Most of them are usually big shows, but there are still chances to catch local bands. However, sometimes driving all the way to Salt Lake isn’t convenient.

Luckily Ogden is becoming a hotspot for local bands to play. This summer the Twilight Concert Series that normally takes place in Salt Lake is coming to Ogden. Similarly, the small music venue called Mojos offers great shows with up and coming bands from around the area.

Mojos has been giving Ogdenites live music since 2003. It offers shows for all ages, and is located near the Megaplex 13 on Washington Boulevard. The venue is small, making the shows personal and fun to watch.

This weekend will feature a show with five local bands. SoupStuF, Eat Crow, Alter Ego, Chronicle Trio and Lucid Landing will play Saturday night starting at 8 p.m.

The five man group SoupStuF comes from Salt Lake City and according to their website their job is “Bringing to your ears a Funky Fresh Flavor of Fantasm.” The band even does a cover of the popular hit “Take on Me.” They have a video on their website of the song.

Eat Crow is from Kaysville. This band delivers a sound similar to The Black Keys, Green Day, Black Sabbath and The White Stripes. They say they’re “just four guys who want to rock and share it with the world.” The band has an original song up on their Reverbnation site called “Anti” that is worth a listen.

Alter Ego, from Davis County, released their first EP in January. The five-song EP is on sale on a website linked to their Facebook page. Listeners are able to buy the tracks to stream online. The band offers an original and unique sound.

Jazz/rock group Chronicle Trio from Salt Lake will also be in the lineup for Saturday. This group also has a few songs available for streaming that can be found on Facebook. The album entitled “The Renaissance Mixtape” has a funky, unique sound that is captured in the recording and will sound even better at Mojos.

Finally, Lucid Landing, originally from Clearfield, will join the lineup for the evening. The band mentions on their Facebook page that they are “A new alternative rock band with a wide range of varieties and materials.”

The band has posted three songs for fans to enjoy. “Thunder” is one of the songs featured on the page and one comment mentioned the song is “heart-wrenchingly beautiful.”

 

There are dozens of venues in Salt Lake City where you can see concerts. Most of them are usually big shows, but there are still chances to catch local bands. However, sometimes driving all the way to Salt Lake isn’t convenient.

Luckily Ogden is becoming a hotspot for local bands to play. This summer the Twilight Concert Series that normally takes place in Salt Lake is coming to Ogden. Similarly, the small music venue called Mojos offers great shows with up and coming bands from around the area.

Mojos has been giving Ogdenites live music since 2003. It offers shows for all ages, and is located near the Megaplex 13 on Washington Boulevard. The venue is small, making the shows personal and fun to watch.

This weekend will feature a show with five local bands. SoupStuF, Eat Crow, Alter Ego, Chronicle Trio and Lucid Landing will play Saturday night starting at 8 p.m.

The five man group SoupStuF comes from Salt Lake City and according to their website their job is “Bringing to your ears a Funky Fresh Flavor of Fantasm.” The band even does a cover of the popular hit “Take on Me.” They have a video on their website of the song.

Eat Crow is from Kaysville. This band delivers a sound similar to The Black Keys, Green Day, Black Sabbath and The White Stripes. They say they’re “just four guys who want to rock and share it with the world.” The band has an original song up on their Reverbnation site called “Anti” that is worth a listen.

Alter Ego, from Davis County, released their first EP in January. The five-song EP is on sale on a website linked to their Facebook page. Listeners are able to buy the tracks to stream online. The band offers an original and unique sound.

Jazz/rock group Chronicle Trio from Salt Lake will also be in the lineup for Saturday. This group also has a few songs available for streaming that can be found on Facebook. The album entitled “The Renaissance Mixtape” has a funky, unique sound that is captured in the recording and will sound even better at Mojos.

Finally, Lucid Landing, originally from Clearfield, will join the lineup for the evening. The band mentions on their Facebook page that they are “A new alternative rock band with a wide range of varieties and materials.”

The band has posted three songs for fans to enjoy. “Thunder” is one of the songs featured on the page and one comment mentioned the song is “heart-wrenchingly beautiful.”

 

La estación de radio KWCR celebra su 50 aniversario

La estación de radio KWCR celebra su 50 aniversario

La estación de radio de la Universidad Estatal de Weber KWCR 88,1 pasó de las ondas de radio a el plantel la semana pasada para celebrar su 50 aniversario.

“KWCR ha estado transmitiendo en FM durante 50 años. Eso es bastante impresionante, teniendo en cuenta que está a cargo de los estudiantes. Así que pensamos que era monumental y algo de lo que se debe estar orgulloso”, dijo el gerente general de KWCR Juan “JP” Orquiz.

Después de cinco décadas de la radiodifusión, la estación de radio dirigida por estudiantes organizó varios eventos para celebrar desde el 13 de abril hasta el 17 en honor a la historia de KWCR en el campus y en todo Ogden.

La emisora ​​de radio no comercial empezó a emitir en 1965, cuando la FCC les concedió licencias para ejecutar una estación de radio de 10 vatios FM, según el sitio web de KWCR .

El asesor actual de KWCR, Eric Harvey dijo que el aniversario de la emisora ​​de radio es una buena forma de dar a conocer su presencia en la radiodifusión.

“Si bien la revolución digital podría haber tomado una gran cantidad de aficionados a la música a otros lugares, sólo queríamos recordar a la gente que todavía tenemos una estación de radio de 50 años de edad, aquí en el campus”, dijo.

A lo largo de los años, la estación ha cambiado de ubicación, personal e incluso su título, pasando por nombres como “The Beat”, “The Edge”, y “Weber FM,” hasta llegar al título actual “KWCR”.

Según Harvey, los miembros del personal estudiantil  filtran casi 50 álbumes a la semana en busca de nueva música alternativa y nuevo talento, especialmente de bandas locales.

Los miembros del personal tocan una amplia gama de música. Apartarse de la corriente principal, la estación se adhiere principalmente a sus raíces más “underground”, dijo Harvey.

“Tocamos principalmente indie rock, el rock, la música punk y la música popular”, dijo Harvey. “Sin embargo, el propósito principal de la estación es el de servir la Universidad Estatal de Weber y a la comunidad Ogden con emisiones de entretenimiento e información.”

La estación de radio es principalmente dirigida por estudiantes. Según Orquiz, los miembros del personal estudiantil crean todos los contenidos y la mayor parte de la música está comisariada por los estudiantes en listas de reproducción.

Para él, esto es lo que hace único a KWCR.

“Hay listas de reproducción en línea en todo el mundo, pero la estación de radio estudiantil esta creada de una manera aún mejor”, dijo Orquiz. “En realidad, estamos tomando el tiempo para buscar y escoger lo mejor de la música.”

Aparte de dar a los estudiantes la oportunidad de experimentar dentro de los lineamientos establecidos por la Comisión Federal de Comunicaciones, KWCR también transmite cuatro horas de música todos los domingos y ofrece programación en español. Además, la programación de los miércoles se dedica específicamente a alentar a los estudiantes a cursar estudios superiores.

Orquiz creció escuchando la estación de radio cuando se llamaba “The Beat”, y dijo que la estación le inspiró a transmitir su propio trabajo. Según él, ser parte de la estación de radio es una gran oportunidad para tocar y decir lo que uno quiera, a pesar de que haya gente a la que no le guste.

“A pesar de las cosas que tocamos puede o puede que no sea popular, sigue siendo una oportunidad genial para tocar lo que quieras y ser parte de una estación de  radio como esta que no existe como en el entorno corporativo”, dijo.

Sin embargo, usted no tiene que ser un DJ para formar parte del estudio, dijo Harvey. Según su sitio web, la estación ofrece experiencia práctica en múltiples áreas, con posiciones que van desde asociaciones con empresas locales hasta directores de medios sociales que promueven la estación.

“Puede ser parte de su experiencia aquí en la universidad, estar al aire y dejar que la gente sepa lo que tiene que decir o que trabajar entre bastidores para ayudar a crecer KWCR “, dijo Harvey.

Aunque toda una semana de actividades se alineaban para celebrar el 50 aniversario de la estación de radio, la celebración no ocurrió sin algunos contratiempos.

Según Orquiz, debido a los conflictos climáticos de última hora, el giant root-beer pong tuvo que ser reprogramado para el 21 de abril a las 10 a.m.

A pesar de este contratiempo, el estudio mantuvo la celebración y se pasó la semana animando a los estudiantes a involucrarse con la estación de radio.

Orquiz dijo que espera que los estudiantes sientan orgullo por su estación de radio de la universidad.

“Parece que estamos a la banda de gamberros que maneja este organismo de radiodifusión”, dijo Orquiz . “Llevamos a cabo una emisora ​​de radio y punto.”

Translated by Ingrid Maldonado.

To read the story in English click here

La estación de radio KWCR celebra su 50 aniversario

La estación de radio de la Universidad Estatal de Weber KWCR 88,1 pasó de las ondas de radio a el plantel la semana pasada para celebrar su 50 aniversario.

“KWCR ha estado transmitiendo en FM durante 50 años. Eso es bastante impresionante, teniendo en cuenta que está a cargo de los estudiantes. Así que pensamos que era monumental y algo de lo que se debe estar orgulloso”, dijo el gerente general de KWCR Juan “JP” Orquiz.

Después de cinco décadas de la radiodifusión, la estación de radio dirigida por estudiantes organizó varios eventos para celebrar desde el 13 de abril hasta el 17 en honor a la historia de KWCR en el campus y en todo Ogden.

La emisora ​​de radio no comercial empezó a emitir en 1965, cuando la FCC les concedió licencias para ejecutar una estación de radio de 10 vatios FM, según el sitio web de KWCR .

El asesor actual de KWCR, Eric Harvey dijo que el aniversario de la emisora ​​de radio es una buena forma de dar a conocer su presencia en la radiodifusión.

“Si bien la revolución digital podría haber tomado una gran cantidad de aficionados a la música a otros lugares, sólo queríamos recordar a la gente que todavía tenemos una estación de radio de 50 años de edad, aquí en el campus”, dijo.

A lo largo de los años, la estación ha cambiado de ubicación, personal e incluso su título, pasando por nombres como “The Beat”, “The Edge”, y “Weber FM,” hasta llegar al título actual “KWCR”.

Según Harvey, los miembros del personal estudiantil  filtran casi 50 álbumes a la semana en busca de nueva música alternativa y nuevo talento, especialmente de bandas locales.

Los miembros del personal tocan una amplia gama de música. Apartarse de la corriente principal, la estación se adhiere principalmente a sus raíces más “underground”, dijo Harvey.

“Tocamos principalmente indie rock, el rock, la música punk y la música popular”, dijo Harvey. “Sin embargo, el propósito principal de la estación es el de servir la Universidad Estatal de Weber y a la comunidad Ogden con emisiones de entretenimiento e información.”

La estación de radio es principalmente dirigida por estudiantes. Según Orquiz, los miembros del personal estudiantil crean todos los contenidos y la mayor parte de la música está comisariada por los estudiantes en listas de reproducción.

Para él, esto es lo que hace único a KWCR.

“Hay listas de reproducción en línea en todo el mundo, pero la estación de radio estudiantil esta creada de una manera aún mejor”, dijo Orquiz. “En realidad, estamos tomando el tiempo para buscar y escoger lo mejor de la música.”

Aparte de dar a los estudiantes la oportunidad de experimentar dentro de los lineamientos establecidos por la Comisión Federal de Comunicaciones, KWCR también transmite cuatro horas de música todos los domingos y ofrece programación en español. Además, la programación de los miércoles se dedica específicamente a alentar a los estudiantes a cursar estudios superiores.

Orquiz creció escuchando la estación de radio cuando se llamaba “The Beat”, y dijo que la estación le inspiró a transmitir su propio trabajo. Según él, ser parte de la estación de radio es una gran oportunidad para tocar y decir lo que uno quiera, a pesar de que haya gente a la que no le guste.

“A pesar de las cosas que tocamos puede o puede que no sea popular, sigue siendo una oportunidad genial para tocar lo que quieras y ser parte de una estación de  radio como esta que no existe como en el entorno corporativo”, dijo.

Sin embargo, usted no tiene que ser un DJ para formar parte del estudio, dijo Harvey. Según su sitio web, la estación ofrece experiencia práctica en múltiples áreas, con posiciones que van desde asociaciones con empresas locales hasta directores de medios sociales que promueven la estación.

“Puede ser parte de su experiencia aquí en la universidad, estar al aire y dejar que la gente sepa lo que tiene que decir o que trabajar entre bastidores para ayudar a crecer KWCR “, dijo Harvey.

Aunque toda una semana de actividades se alineaban para celebrar el 50 aniversario de la estación de radio, la celebración no ocurrió sin algunos contratiempos.

Según Orquiz, debido a los conflictos climáticos de última hora, el giant root-beer pong tuvo que ser reprogramado para el 21 de abril a las 10 a.m.

A pesar de este contratiempo, el estudio mantuvo la celebración y se pasó la semana animando a los estudiantes a involucrarse con la estación de radio.

Orquiz dijo que espera que los estudiantes sientan orgullo por su estación de radio de la universidad.

“Parece que estamos a la banda de gamberros que maneja este organismo de radiodifusión”, dijo Orquiz . “Llevamos a cabo una emisora ​​de radio y punto.”

Translated by Ingrid Maldonado.

To read the story in English click here

Weber State’s radio station KWCR 88.1 went from the airwaves to campus grounds this past week to celebrate its 50th anniversary. “KWCR has been broadcasting in FM for 50 years. That is pretty impressive, considering it’s run by students. So we thought that was monumental and something to be proud of,” said KWCR general manager Juan “JP” Orquiz. After five decades of broadcasting, the student-run radio station hosted several celebratory events from April 13-17 in honor of KWCR’s history on campus and throughout Ogden. The non-commercial radio station started broadcasting in 1965 when the FCC granted them licensing to run a 10-watt FM radio station, according to the KWCR website.  

radio_2

The KWCR radio station back in its earlier stages of broadcasting. (Source: KWCR Press Release Photos)

Current KWCR advisor Eric Harvey said the radio station’s anniversary was a great way to raise awareness of its broadcasting presence. “While the digital revolution might have taken a lot of music fans elsewhere, we just wanted to remind people that we still have a 50-year-old radio station here on campus,” he said. Throughout the years, the station has changed location, staff and even its title, going through names such as “The Beat,” “The Edge,” and “Weber FM,” to the current title “KWCR.” According to Harvey, the student staff members filter through nearly 50 albums a week in search for new alternative music and fresh talent, especially from local bands. The staff members play a broad range of music. Straying from mainstream, the station primarily sticks to its more “underground” roots, said Harvey.  “We play primarily indie rock, rock music, punk music and folk music,” said Harvey. “However, the main purpose of the station is to serve Weber State and the Ogden community with entertaining and informative broadcasts.” The radio station is primarily student-run. According to Orquiz, the student staff members create all the content and most of the music is custom curated by students into playlists.   For him, this is what makes KWCR unique.   “There’s playlists everywhere online, but the student radio station is created in a way that is even better,” Orquiz said. “We are actually taking the time to feed through and pick out the very best music.” Along with giving students the chance to experiment within guidelines set by the Federal Communications Commission, KWCR also broadcasts four hours of music every Sunday and offers Spanish-language programming. Additionally, the Wednesday show is specifically devoted to encouraging students to pursue higher education. Orquiz grew up listening to the radio station back when it was “The Beat,” and said the station inspired him to broadcast his own work. According to him, being part of the radio station is a great opportunity to play and say what you want, regardless if some people may not like it. “Although the stuff we play may or may not be popular, it’s still a really cool opportunity to play what you want and be part of radio that doesn’t exist quite like this in the corporate setting,” he said.    However, you don’t have to be a DJ to be part of the studio, said Harvey. According to their website, the station offers hands-on experience in multiple areas, with positions ranging from partnerships with local businesses to social media directors who promote the station.

radio

General manager Juan “JP” Orquiz works in the studio for the student-run radio station KWCR 88.1 FM. (Source: KWCR Press Release Photos)

“It can be part of your experience here at Weber State, getting on the air and letting people know what you have to say or working behind the scenes to help KWCR rise,” said Harvey. Although a whole week of activities were lined up to celebrate the radio’s 50th birthday, celebrations did not go off without a few hitches. According to Orquiz, due to last-minute weather conflicts, the giant root-beer pong had to be rescheduled to April 21 at 10 a.m. Despite this setback, the studio kept up the celebration and  spent the week encouraging students to get involved. Orquiz said he hoped students got a new sense of pride for their college radio station. “It seems like we are just  band of hooligans running this broadcasting organization,” said Orquiz. “We run a radio station, and that’s the quick and dirty of it.”  Weber State’s radio station KWCR 88.1 went from the airwaves to campus grounds this past week to celebrate its 50th anniversary. “KWCR has been broadcasting in FM for 50 years. That is pretty impressive, considering it’s run by students. So we thought that was monumental and something to be proud of,” said KWCR general manager Juan “JP” Orquiz. After five decades of broadcasting, the student-run radio station hosted several celebratory events from April 13-17 in honor of KWCR’s history on campus and throughout Ogden. The non-commercial radio station started broadcasting in 1965 when the FCC granted them licensing to run a 10-watt FM radio station, according to the KWCR website.  

The KWCR radio station back in its earlier stages of broadcasting. (Source: KWCR Press Release Photos)

Current KWCR advisor Eric Harvey said the radio station’s anniversary was a great way to raise awareness of its broadcasting presence. “While the digital revolution might have taken a lot of music fans elsewhere, we just wanted to remind people that we still have a 50-year-old radio station here on campus,” he said. Throughout the years, the station has changed location, staff and even its title, going through names such as “The Beat,” “The Edge,” and “Weber FM,” to the current title “KWCR.” According to Harvey, the student staff members filter through nearly 50 albums a week in search for new alternative music and fresh talent, especially from local bands. The staff members play a broad range of music. Straying from mainstream, the station primarily sticks to its more “underground” roots, said Harvey.  “We play primarily indie rock, rock music, punk music and folk music,” said Harvey. “However, the main purpose of the station is to serve Weber State and the Ogden community with entertaining and informative broadcasts.” The radio station is primarily student-run. According to Orquiz, the student staff members create all the content and most of the music is custom curated by students into playlists.   For him, this is what makes KWCR unique.   “There’s playlists everywhere online, but the student radio station is created in a way that is even better,” Orquiz said. “We are actually taking the time to feed through and pick out the very best music.” Along with giving students the chance to experiment within guidelines set by the Federal Communications Commission, KWCR also broadcasts four hours of music every Sunday and offers Spanish-language programming. Additionally, the Wednesday show is specifically devoted to encouraging students to pursue higher education. Orquiz grew up listening to the radio station back when it was “The Beat,” and said the station inspired him to broadcast his own work. According to him, being part of the radio station is a great opportunity to play and say what you want, regardless if some people may not like it. “Although the stuff we play may or may not be popular, it’s still a really cool opportunity to play what you want and be part of radio that doesn’t exist quite like this in the corporate setting,” he said.    However, you don’t have to be a DJ to be part of the studio, said Harvey. According to their website, the station offers hands-on experience in multiple areas, with positions ranging from partnerships with local businesses to social media directors who promote the station.

General manager Juan “JP” Orquiz works in the studio for the student-run radio station KWCR 88.1 FM. (Source: KWCR Press Release Photos)

“It can be part of your experience here at Weber State, getting on the air and letting people know what you have to say or working behind the scenes to help KWCR rise,” said Harvey. Although a whole week of activities were lined up to celebrate the radio’s 50th birthday, celebrations did not go off without a few hitches. According to Orquiz, due to last-minute weather conflicts, the giant root-beer pong had to be rescheduled to April 21 at 10 a.m. Despite this setback, the studio kept up the celebration and  spent the week encouraging students to get involved. Orquiz said he hoped students got a new sense of pride for their college radio station. “It seems like we are just  band of hooligans running this broadcasting organization,” said Orquiz. “We run a radio station, and that’s the quick and dirty of it.” 
Luke Bryan performs during the Stagecoach Country Music Festival in Indio, California, on April 28, 2012. (Source Allen J. Schaben/Los Angeles Times/MCT)

Luke Bryan performs during the Stagecoach Country Music Festival in Indio, California on April 28, 2012. (Source Allen J. Schaben/Los Angeles Times/Tribune News Service)

Summer is rounding the corner, and so are summer concerts.

Luke Bryan

For any country fans out there, Luke Bryan will be coming to town Wednesday, August 26 at the USANA Amphitheater. Tickets will be priced at $75 per ticket.

This will give die-hard Luke Bryan fans the chance to see the country rock star in concert.

Jon Bellion

This rising pop star will be performing in Utah on Monday, June 1 at The Grand @ The Complex. Tickets for Bellion’s concert will be $15.

Bellion is a songwriter, as well as an aspiring rapper, whose first album release, “Scattered Thoughts Vol 1,” reached over 11,000 downloads.

Twenty One Pilots

This alternative rock band will come to Utah Saturday, September 26 at the Saltair in Magna. Tickets will run for $32.

Twenty One Pilots is an American duo from Columbus, Ohio, which formed back in 2009. Fans of Twenty One Pilots can expect their new album, “Blurryface,” on May 19.

Sam Smith

This English singer and songwriter is coming to town on August 5 at the Maverick Center. Tickets will range from $52 to $993 (the latter for front-row seating).

Smith rose to fame in 2012 with his single “Latch,” reaching eleventh on UK single charts.

Nickelback

Nickelback and Lifehouse are coming in concert at the USANA Amphitheater on July 5. Tickets range from $20 to $85.

Nickelback is a Canadian band, who has risen in the charts since 1995, selling over 50 million albums worldwide.

Twilight Concert series  

The Twilight concert series comes to Pioneer Park in Salt Lake City, running Thursday nights during the summer. Concerts start on July 16 and go through August 27. To kick off the summer, Indie band Death Cab for Cutie will be first in the lineup.

Tickets for this concert series are on sale now for $30. Once the full lineup for the series is released, all tickets will be raised in price to $35.

Students can look forward to these upcoming concerts to kick off the beginning and end of summer.

 

 

Luke Bryan performs during the Stagecoach Country Music Festival in Indio, California on April 28, 2012. (Source Allen J. Schaben/Los Angeles Times/Tribune News Service)

Summer is rounding the corner, and so are summer concerts.

Luke Bryan

For any country fans out there, Luke Bryan will be coming to town Wednesday, August 26 at the USANA Amphitheater. Tickets will be priced at $75 per ticket.

This will give die-hard Luke Bryan fans the chance to see the country rock star in concert.

Jon Bellion

This rising pop star will be performing in Utah on Monday, June 1 at The Grand @ The Complex. Tickets for Bellion’s concert will be $15.

Bellion is a songwriter, as well as an aspiring rapper, whose first album release, “Scattered Thoughts Vol 1,” reached over 11,000 downloads.

Twenty One Pilots

This alternative rock band will come to Utah Saturday, September 26 at the Saltair in Magna. Tickets will run for $32.

Twenty One Pilots is an American duo from Columbus, Ohio, which formed back in 2009. Fans of Twenty One Pilots can expect their new album, “Blurryface,” on May 19.

Sam Smith

This English singer and songwriter is coming to town on August 5 at the Maverick Center. Tickets will range from $52 to $993 (the latter for front-row seating).

Smith rose to fame in 2012 with his single “Latch,” reaching eleventh on UK single charts.

Nickelback

Nickelback and Lifehouse are coming in concert at the USANA Amphitheater on July 5. Tickets range from $20 to $85.

Nickelback is a Canadian band, who has risen in the charts since 1995, selling over 50 million albums worldwide.

Twilight Concert series  

The Twilight concert series comes to Pioneer Park in Salt Lake City, running Thursday nights during the summer. Concerts start on July 16 and go through August 27. To kick off the summer, Indie band Death Cab for Cutie will be first in the lineup.

Tickets for this concert series are on sale now for $30. Once the full lineup for the series is released, all tickets will be raised in price to $35.

Students can look forward to these upcoming concerts to kick off the beginning and end of summer.

 

 

The Cribs "For All My Sisters"

The Cribs “For All My Sisters”

UK brother band The Cribs offers listeners their sixth album titled “For All My Sisters.”

Over the last year, the band convened with The Cars front man Ric Ocasek for this album. According to The Syndicate, the band has a new perspective which comes along with new challenges. The band continues to evolve and thrill “whilst stockpiling an enviable arsenal of songs,” The Syndicate said.

Twins Gary and Ryan along with their younger sibling Ross formed The Cribs back in 2002 through Squirrel Records. Following several successes, the brothers have collaborated with many different people in past albums. Currently with Sonic Blew records, Gary mentioned on the band’s Facebook page that the aim is to “make a better record each time.”

The Cribs are able to achieve a lot in one single album. “For All My Sisters” is an album that can reach fans of many different tastes in music. Great beats and even better vocals let listeners soak in the good vibes from the band. The album starts out in a cheerful and energized way, which is not only entertaining but it makes listeners want to see what else is in store.

One of the best songs on the album is “Diamond Girl.” It’s a song about being yourself, which everyone can relate to. Similarly, the song “Burning for No One” has an amazing beat to it and a good rock n’ roll vibe.

The coolest song on this album was “An Ivory Hand.” There was something about this song that will make you want to dance around while listening to it. One can also appreciate that the band is able to incorporate electronic sounds without becoming overwhelming for the listener.

One  issue new listeners might encounter is that many of the songs blend together. It’s not until the song “Pink Snow” that listeners get to see a different side of The Cribs. The song is slow and has a melancholic tone to it. The band expresses variation through lyrics like, “To all my sisters, I promise you that I’ll try and be brave for you.”

If The Cribs are a sound you enjoy check out The Rakes, Mystery Jets or The View. The Cribs “For All My Sisters” is a three star album for this reviewer. They have energy and a good sound that many can enjoy without difficulty.

 

The Cribs “For All My Sisters”

UK brother band The Cribs offers listeners their sixth album titled “For All My Sisters.”

Over the last year, the band convened with The Cars front man Ric Ocasek for this album. According to The Syndicate, the band has a new perspective which comes along with new challenges. The band continues to evolve and thrill “whilst stockpiling an enviable arsenal of songs,” The Syndicate said.

Twins Gary and Ryan along with their younger sibling Ross formed The Cribs back in 2002 through Squirrel Records. Following several successes, the brothers have collaborated with many different people in past albums. Currently with Sonic Blew records, Gary mentioned on the band’s Facebook page that the aim is to “make a better record each time.”

The Cribs are able to achieve a lot in one single album. “For All My Sisters” is an album that can reach fans of many different tastes in music. Great beats and even better vocals let listeners soak in the good vibes from the band. The album starts out in a cheerful and energized way, which is not only entertaining but it makes listeners want to see what else is in store.

One of the best songs on the album is “Diamond Girl.” It’s a song about being yourself, which everyone can relate to. Similarly, the song “Burning for No One” has an amazing beat to it and a good rock n’ roll vibe.

The coolest song on this album was “An Ivory Hand.” There was something about this song that will make you want to dance around while listening to it. One can also appreciate that the band is able to incorporate electronic sounds without becoming overwhelming for the listener.

One  issue new listeners might encounter is that many of the songs blend together. It’s not until the song “Pink Snow” that listeners get to see a different side of The Cribs. The song is slow and has a melancholic tone to it. The band expresses variation through lyrics like, “To all my sisters, I promise you that I’ll try and be brave for you.”

If The Cribs are a sound you enjoy check out The Rakes, Mystery Jets or The View. The Cribs “For All My Sisters” is a three star album for this reviewer. They have energy and a good sound that many can enjoy without difficulty.

 

Torche is a group geared towards lovers of heavy music.

Torche is a group geared towards lovers of heavier music.

For many metal fans—myself included—the harder the music, the better.

Hailing from Florida, the rock band Torche was formed in 2004, and they claim they are a band that is “playing the loudest and heaviest in hard rock.” Their new album “Restarter” was released this passed March, and fans of heavier music can definitely enjoy this group.

The album starts out with a heavy rhythm and effects that make this metal enthusiast feel right at home. The band creates amazing sounds with some songs that are slow with repeating rhythms. The song “Minions” is an example of this. The steady sound of heavy guitar drives the song at a slow pace that let’s listeners focus on the vocals of the track.

Contrasted by the song “Loose Men,” Torche accomplishes a different feel. It mixes in different elements to make the song more upbeat and lively. Still including a heavy, driving rhythm, the faster pace makes this a song for listeners to rock out to.

Similarly, the shorter track titled “Undone” is a song for listeners to just head bang to. The song is only a minute and 40 seconds long—just long enough to head bang to without hurting your neck too badly.

Admittedly, many of the songs tend to blend together. This group tends to use the same rhythm or slight variations thereof, making listeners long for something a little different. Making songs different without sacrificing their style and still sticking with the overall theme of the album is something many bands have yet to master.

Bands such as Baroness, Floor and High on Fire are groups that you’ll want to look up if you enjoy Torche. This album gets three out of five stars from me because while I enjoyed the heaviness and that it speaks to my love of metal, I was looking for songs that really stuck out and didn’t sound so similar.

 

Torche is a group geared towards lovers of heavier music.

For many metal fans—myself included—the harder the music, the better.

Hailing from Florida, the rock band Torche was formed in 2004, and they claim they are a band that is “playing the loudest and heaviest in hard rock.” Their new album “Restarter” was released this passed March, and fans of heavier music can definitely enjoy this group.

The album starts out with a heavy rhythm and effects that make this metal enthusiast feel right at home. The band creates amazing sounds with some songs that are slow with repeating rhythms. The song “Minions” is an example of this. The steady sound of heavy guitar drives the song at a slow pace that let’s listeners focus on the vocals of the track.

Contrasted by the song “Loose Men,” Torche accomplishes a different feel. It mixes in different elements to make the song more upbeat and lively. Still including a heavy, driving rhythm, the faster pace makes this a song for listeners to rock out to.

Similarly, the shorter track titled “Undone” is a song for listeners to just head bang to. The song is only a minute and 40 seconds long—just long enough to head bang to without hurting your neck too badly.

Admittedly, many of the songs tend to blend together. This group tends to use the same rhythm or slight variations thereof, making listeners long for something a little different. Making songs different without sacrificing their style and still sticking with the overall theme of the album is something many bands have yet to master.

Bands such as Baroness, Floor and High on Fire are groups that you’ll want to look up if you enjoy Torche. This album gets three out of five stars from me because while I enjoyed the heaviness and that it speaks to my love of metal, I was looking for songs that really stuck out and didn’t sound so similar.

 

(Photo Courtesy of the Telitha E. Lindquist College of Arts and Humanities)

Choral singers perform gospel, folk and classical vocal pieces at the Austad Auditorium in the Browning Center. (Photo Courtesy of the Telitha E. Lindquist College of Arts and Humanities)

Southern gospel music, traditional folk songs and classical vocal pieces will all be found this Thursday at Weber State’s Spring Choirfest.

This event, held in the Austad auditorium in the Browning Center at 7:30 p.m., will be the last concert event of the season for WSU’s choir and chamber choir. Both have been preparing for two months perfecting the songs and preparing a show for the audience to enjoy.

Christie Denniston, director of marketing and public relations, feels that this show will be unique because of the talent that will be on stage.

“I think one of the attributes that distinguishes this performance is that some world class performers are going to go on and perform professionally,” Denniston said. “It is one of the audiences last chance to see some of these individuals here on our stage as students before they go out into the world and perform.”

Graduating senior and vocal performance major Derek Myler felt his last performance has a lot of variety with songs and a lot of talent on stage. Derek felt this show stands out in the type of music being performed.

“We are doing a set in a music called a sacred harp tradition which is a style of choral singing which started in the south,” said Myler. “It is really, really rare that is done on a concert stage.”

It’s not only the songs that are challenging. Many of the performers not only sing but also play instruments or conduct for the performance. Myler plays piano for a couple songs and fellow senior Carolyn Kingston helped conduct pieces.

Myler and Kingston both had challenges with their performances.

“It made me stop and think what my conducting style is,” said Kingston. “I had to consider what I got from the music and what I wanted them to do.”

One song that Myler and Kingston both feel the audience will appreciate is “Baba Yetu,” the Lord’s Prayer performed in Swahili.

“I think the audience will enjoy ‘Baba Yetu.’ It will be done with traditional African sound and some soloists are going to be doing some improvisation,” said Myler. “It is a very fun and lively piece.”

For Kingston, singing and conducting as a senior have made her realize why she likes to perform on stage.

“(We) are sharing something that is very personal and a big part of ourselves when we perform or sing together,” said Kingston.

This concert will have a wide variety of songs performed and the performers have put everything they have into each song.

“It is always good for people to come out and see some diversity,” said Myler. “(This diversity) I think is something beneficial for people to expose themselves to.”

Choral singers perform gospel, folk and classical vocal pieces at the Austad Auditorium in the Browning Center. (Photo Courtesy of the Telitha E. Lindquist College of Arts and Humanities)

Southern gospel music, traditional folk songs and classical vocal pieces will all be found this Thursday at Weber State’s Spring Choirfest.

This event, held in the Austad auditorium in the Browning Center at 7:30 p.m., will be the last concert event of the season for WSU’s choir and chamber choir. Both have been preparing for two months perfecting the songs and preparing a show for the audience to enjoy.

Christie Denniston, director of marketing and public relations, feels that this show will be unique because of the talent that will be on stage.

“I think one of the attributes that distinguishes this performance is that some world class performers are going to go on and perform professionally,” Denniston said. “It is one of the audiences last chance to see some of these individuals here on our stage as students before they go out into the world and perform.”

Graduating senior and vocal performance major Derek Myler felt his last performance has a lot of variety with songs and a lot of talent on stage. Derek felt this show stands out in the type of music being performed.

“We are doing a set in a music called a sacred harp tradition which is a style of choral singing which started in the south,” said Myler. “It is really, really rare that is done on a concert stage.”

It’s not only the songs that are challenging. Many of the performers not only sing but also play instruments or conduct for the performance. Myler plays piano for a couple songs and fellow senior Carolyn Kingston helped conduct pieces.

Myler and Kingston both had challenges with their performances.

“It made me stop and think what my conducting style is,” said Kingston. “I had to consider what I got from the music and what I wanted them to do.”

One song that Myler and Kingston both feel the audience will appreciate is “Baba Yetu,” the Lord’s Prayer performed in Swahili.

“I think the audience will enjoy ‘Baba Yetu.’ It will be done with traditional African sound and some soloists are going to be doing some improvisation,” said Myler. “It is a very fun and lively piece.”

For Kingston, singing and conducting as a senior have made her realize why she likes to perform on stage.

“(We) are sharing something that is very personal and a big part of ourselves when we perform or sing together,” said Kingston.

This concert will have a wide variety of songs performed and the performers have put everything they have into each song.

“It is always good for people to come out and see some diversity,” said Myler. “(This diversity) I think is something beneficial for people to expose themselves to.”

Piano major Ling-Yu Lee poses by the instrument she connected with since she was 6 years old. (Photo provided by Dr. Yu-Jane Yang.)

Piano major Ling-Yu Lee poses by the instrument she has connected with since she was 6 years old. (Photo Courtesy of Professor Yu-Jane Yang.)

Some students figure out what they want to do professionally during their time in college, while others come to college with a clear vision of their future. Some aspire to one day become doctors, teachers, reporters or business owners. For Weber State University junior Ling-Yu Lee, she knew what she wanted to be a professional pianist since high school.

Lee was born and raised in Taipei, Taiwan, where her family is currently living. After graduating high school, Lee moved to the United States to attend WSU as a piano performance major.

From a young age, Lee connected with the piano and began taking lessons when she was 6 years old. She began piano lessons from her aunt and progressed to advanced lessons while in third grade. While attending middle school in Taiwan, Lee became uncertain of her future with piano performance.

“I think one of the reasons I didn’t like it was because I was a little afraid of performing for people,” Lee said. “I thought maybe performing on stage just wasn’t for me.”

However, after a competition two years ago, Lee was approached by a professor who heard her perform.

“He came over and said that I touched his heart, and that gave me assurance that I should be doing piano,” Lee said.

Lee said that gradually through high school she found more confidence in her piano performance through supportive teachers.

“I think the training I’ve received here helped me focus on what I need to pay attention to as I’m playing,” Lee said. “I eventually got to where I didn’t care about the people around me.”

The piano major will also invite her friends to listen to her pieces before performances and give her feedback.

“They’re so supportive and super nice,” Lee said.

Cicely Fabiano, Sara Song and Katie Swainston are friends of Lee’s who have witnessed her musical performances. Swainston described Lee’s music as captivating.

“I love how Ling captures the audience with all her different colors, tones and characters in her music,” Swainston said. “She feels the music and because she feels the music, the audience can as well.”

Fabiano said that Lee’s position and body movement draws emotion from the audience as she plays.

“It’s so intense,” Fabiano said. “As she plays the notes, you can see from the expression on her face and the way her head and upper body move that she means what she plays.”

Song described Lee’s performances with one word: fabulous.

Lee has entered and won several musical competitions with her piano playing throughout her life. She recently won first place in the Utah Music Teacher Association competition entering her into the Southwest Division competition where she again won first place.

“I looked at my teacher and thought it couldn’t be real,” Lee said.

WSU Performing Arts Professor Yu-Jane Yang is Lee’s piano professor. Before Lee’s competitions, Yang reminds her that the key is to leave no questions in the judges’ minds.

“I tell Ling to let the music flow through her body, then come out of her fingers,” Yang said.

Aside from her piano competitions, Lee also focuses on her studies at WSU and spending time with her friends. She enjoys movies and being in the outdoors.

“Being from Taiwan in the big city, we don’t have a lot of outdoors,” Lee said. “So my friends and I went on a hike during spring break and it was fun.”

Once Lee graduates from Weber State University, she plans to attend graduate school in America to further her passion for playing the piano.

 

Piano major Ling-Yu Lee poses by the instrument she has connected with since she was 6 years old. (Photo Courtesy of Professor Yu-Jane Yang.)

Some students figure out what they want to do professionally during their time in college, while others come to college with a clear vision of their future. Some aspire to one day become doctors, teachers, reporters or business owners. For Weber State University junior Ling-Yu Lee, she knew what she wanted to be a professional pianist since high school.

Lee was born and raised in Taipei, Taiwan, where her family is currently living. After graduating high school, Lee moved to the United States to attend WSU as a piano performance major.

From a young age, Lee connected with the piano and began taking lessons when she was 6 years old. She began piano lessons from her aunt and progressed to advanced lessons while in third grade. While attending middle school in Taiwan, Lee became uncertain of her future with piano performance.

“I think one of the reasons I didn’t like it was because I was a little afraid of performing for people,” Lee said. “I thought maybe performing on stage just wasn’t for me.”

However, after a competition two years ago, Lee was approached by a professor who heard her perform.

“He came over and said that I touched his heart, and that gave me assurance that I should be doing piano,” Lee said.

Lee said that gradually through high school she found more confidence in her piano performance through supportive teachers.

“I think the training I’ve received here helped me focus on what I need to pay attention to as I’m playing,” Lee said. “I eventually got to where I didn’t care about the people around me.”

The piano major will also invite her friends to listen to her pieces before performances and give her feedback.

“They’re so supportive and super nice,” Lee said.

Cicely Fabiano, Sara Song and Katie Swainston are friends of Lee’s who have witnessed her musical performances. Swainston described Lee’s music as captivating.

“I love how Ling captures the audience with all her different colors, tones and characters in her music,” Swainston said. “She feels the music and because she feels the music, the audience can as well.”

Fabiano said that Lee’s position and body movement draws emotion from the audience as she plays.

“It’s so intense,” Fabiano said. “As she plays the notes, you can see from the expression on her face and the way her head and upper body move that she means what she plays.”

Song described Lee’s performances with one word: fabulous.

Lee has entered and won several musical competitions with her piano playing throughout her life. She recently won first place in the Utah Music Teacher Association competition entering her into the Southwest Division competition where she again won first place.

“I looked at my teacher and thought it couldn’t be real,” Lee said.

WSU Performing Arts Professor Yu-Jane Yang is Lee’s piano professor. Before Lee’s competitions, Yang reminds her that the key is to leave no questions in the judges’ minds.

“I tell Ling to let the music flow through her body, then come out of her fingers,” Yang said.

Aside from her piano competitions, Lee also focuses on her studies at WSU and spending time with her friends. She enjoys movies and being in the outdoors.

“Being from Taiwan in the big city, we don’t have a lot of outdoors,” Lee said. “So my friends and I went on a hike during spring break and it was fun.”

Once Lee graduates from Weber State University, she plans to attend graduate school in America to further her passion for playing the piano.

 

"Strangers to Ourselves" offers listeners a wide variety of elements to listen to.

“Strangers to Ourselves” offers listeners a wide variety of elements to listen to.

Alternative rock group Modest Mouse was formed in 1993, and over the last decade, they have become a staple for the genre. With the release of their second album in 1997, the band reached new heights with a legion of fans. The band has had two Grammy nominations and has spent time on the Billboard Top 200 at number one.

Their newest album “Strangers to Ourselves” starts out with a slow, orchestral rhythm that listeners can ease into. The track is calming, making listeners look forward to what else is to come. The preceding song is very upbeat and includes rapping, giving listeners a variance in sound.

One thing listeners should note  is the band’s ability to seamlessly blend sounds of actual instruments with computer generated sounds.

“The Ground Walks, with Time in a Box” also offers listeners a unique experience. This track has a very funky almost disco beat to it. “Pups to Dust” is a great song for listeners to relate to on this album. The song states, “Our hearts don’t change from pups to dust,” and “Love does not cost money but is not free.” These lyrics are heartfelt and give listeners something they can relate to and enjoy.

Another track listeners should focus on is “Sugar Boats.” This song offers an amazing use of piano and orchestral instruments that also fuses great sounding guitar riffs. With such a dedicated fan base, those who already enjoy Modest Mouse can rejoice at this album and enjoy it in its entirety. Those who don’t normally listen to this type of music can find solace in hearing something new and refreshing.

Fans of Modest Mouse will also enjoy Spoon, Death Cab for Cutie and Silversun Pickups. This album warrants three stars out of five. Because there are so many elements to enjoy, fans of all types of music can begin to enjoy this group.

“Strangers to Ourselves” offers listeners a wide variety of elements to listen to.

Alternative rock group Modest Mouse was formed in 1993, and over the last decade, they have become a staple for the genre. With the release of their second album in 1997, the band reached new heights with a legion of fans. The band has had two Grammy nominations and has spent time on the Billboard Top 200 at number one.

Their newest album “Strangers to Ourselves” starts out with a slow, orchestral rhythm that listeners can ease into. The track is calming, making listeners look forward to what else is to come. The preceding song is very upbeat and includes rapping, giving listeners a variance in sound.

One thing listeners should note  is the band’s ability to seamlessly blend sounds of actual instruments with computer generated sounds.

“The Ground Walks, with Time in a Box” also offers listeners a unique experience. This track has a very funky almost disco beat to it. “Pups to Dust” is a great song for listeners to relate to on this album. The song states, “Our hearts don’t change from pups to dust,” and “Love does not cost money but is not free.” These lyrics are heartfelt and give listeners something they can relate to and enjoy.

Another track listeners should focus on is “Sugar Boats.” This song offers an amazing use of piano and orchestral instruments that also fuses great sounding guitar riffs. With such a dedicated fan base, those who already enjoy Modest Mouse can rejoice at this album and enjoy it in its entirety. Those who don’t normally listen to this type of music can find solace in hearing something new and refreshing.

Fans of Modest Mouse will also enjoy Spoon, Death Cab for Cutie and Silversun Pickups. This album warrants three stars out of five. Because there are so many elements to enjoy, fans of all types of music can begin to enjoy this group.

(Photo Courtesy of Deanne Jones)

Myler as Sharpless, the American Consul to Japan, in WSU’s recent production of “Madam Butterfly.” (Photo Courtesy of Deanne Jones)

How many undergraduate music students can claim they’ve been winning national composition competitions since their early teens? Derek Myler, a senior in Weber State University’s vocal program, is doing just that.

He routinely premiers new, original compositions with the WSU combined Chamber and Concert choirs and the WSU Symphonic Orchestra. In addition, he’s taken home awards from many prestigious competitions for his work. On March 25, students will have the opportunity to see Myler perform his senior recital, in which he will premiere a new, original work with the help of several other WSU music students.

“It’s been a really tremendous experience to work with somebody with the gifts and talents that Derek has,” Karen Bruestle, head of the voice and opera program and Myler’s private voice teacher, said. “He really encompasses the whole realm of musicianship and that, as his teacher, has been really fun.”

Myler just finished participating in WSU’s production of “Madam Butterfly,” as Sharpless, the American consul in Nagasaki, Japan. Bruestle explained that it’s  rare to find individuals with skill sets similar to Myler’s.

“It’s rare to find a student that not only possesses a really beautiful voice and is a very engaged, active performer, but is also a dynamic pianist and composer,” Bruestle said. “He’s a multifaceted musician and that’s pretty rare to have all of those elements in a student.”

Bruestle encouraged all students, especially non-music students, to come to Myler’s recital. Unlike many other student recitals, Bruestle said, Myler’s is a lecture recital, meaning he will stop and talk with the audience about the music between sets.

“It’s really very novel what he’s doing and I’m hoping it will set a standard for other students and encourage them to do the same thing in their recitals,” Bruestle said. “As an audience member, I always appreciate when the performer takes an interest in me and tells me about the music and how they feel about it.”

Catie Omer, a recent WSU graduate in vocal pedagogy, echoed Bruestle’s sentiments, noting Myler’s genius is accompanied by a humble attitude.

“Derek is a genius and he’s one of the most humble people about it,” Omer said. “He would never put himself out there claiming to be what he really is, and we used to joke that he’ll be the next Bach, but really he’s the next Charles Ives and his music is just brilliant.”

Omer said one of her favorite pieces of Myler’s is an emotional, yet beautiful, choral piece called “Christmas 1942, Auschwitz.”

“You can tell he’s very emotional about his music but also very analytical as well,” Omer said. “He doesn’t just let the music get away from him. He keeps it grounded and he has a purpose for everything that he’s doing.”

Omer noted that students who attend Myler’s recital can expect to hear different and interesting classical music.

“He always does music that’s not the traditional, standard that you hear at student recitals. He always does really interesting things you’ve never heard before,” Omer said.

Caleb Jardine, a friend of Myler’s and fellow student in the voice program, said he admires that ability.

“Derek’s music is hard to describe. It’s beautiful and deep,” Jardine said. “Derek is one of the most passionate people about music that I’ve ever met. He’s a genius.”

Myler’s senior recital will be March 25 at 7:30 p.m. in the Garrison Choral room in the Val A. Browning Center for the Performing arts and admission is free.

Myler as Sharpless, the American Consul to Japan, in WSU’s recent production of “Madam Butterfly.” (Photo Courtesy of Deanne Jones)

How many undergraduate music students can claim they’ve been winning national composition competitions since their early teens? Derek Myler, a senior in Weber State University’s vocal program, is doing just that.

He routinely premiers new, original compositions with the WSU combined Chamber and Concert choirs and the WSU Symphonic Orchestra. In addition, he’s taken home awards from many prestigious competitions for his work. On March 25, students will have the opportunity to see Myler perform his senior recital, in which he will premiere a new, original work with the help of several other WSU music students.

“It’s been a really tremendous experience to work with somebody with the gifts and talents that Derek has,” Karen Bruestle, head of the voice and opera program and Myler’s private voice teacher, said. “He really encompasses the whole realm of musicianship and that, as his teacher, has been really fun.”

Myler just finished participating in WSU’s production of “Madam Butterfly,” as Sharpless, the American consul in Nagasaki, Japan. Bruestle explained that it’s  rare to find individuals with skill sets similar to Myler’s.

“It’s rare to find a student that not only possesses a really beautiful voice and is a very engaged, active performer, but is also a dynamic pianist and composer,” Bruestle said. “He’s a multifaceted musician and that’s pretty rare to have all of those elements in a student.”

Bruestle encouraged all students, especially non-music students, to come to Myler’s recital. Unlike many other student recitals, Bruestle said, Myler’s is a lecture recital, meaning he will stop and talk with the audience about the music between sets.

“It’s really very novel what he’s doing and I’m hoping it will set a standard for other students and encourage them to do the same thing in their recitals,” Bruestle said. “As an audience member, I always appreciate when the performer takes an interest in me and tells me about the music and how they feel about it.”

Catie Omer, a recent WSU graduate in vocal pedagogy, echoed Bruestle’s sentiments, noting Myler’s genius is accompanied by a humble attitude.

“Derek is a genius and he’s one of the most humble people about it,” Omer said. “He would never put himself out there claiming to be what he really is, and we used to joke that he’ll be the next Bach, but really he’s the next Charles Ives and his music is just brilliant.”

Omer said one of her favorite pieces of Myler’s is an emotional, yet beautiful, choral piece called “Christmas 1942, Auschwitz.”

“You can tell he’s very emotional about his music but also very analytical as well,” Omer said. “He doesn’t just let the music get away from him. He keeps it grounded and he has a purpose for everything that he’s doing.”

Omer noted that students who attend Myler’s recital can expect to hear different and interesting classical music.

“He always does music that’s not the traditional, standard that you hear at student recitals. He always does really interesting things you’ve never heard before,” Omer said.

Caleb Jardine, a friend of Myler’s and fellow student in the voice program, said he admires that ability.

“Derek’s music is hard to describe. It’s beautiful and deep,” Jardine said. “Derek is one of the most passionate people about music that I’ve ever met. He’s a genius.”

Myler’s senior recital will be March 25 at 7:30 p.m. in the Garrison Choral room in the Val A. Browning Center for the Performing arts and admission is free.

(Courtesy of the Telitha E. Lindquist College of Arts & Humanities)

Root started teaching at WSU in 1984. Tuesday’s concert will mark the end of his career at WSU. (Courtesy of the Telitha E. Lindquist College of Arts & Humanities)

While the Val A. Browning Center holds so many beginnings for students, on March 24 it will fill with finality as professor Thomas Root performs in his last concert as director of the WSU Band.

Root has taught music at Weber State University for just over 30 years, focusing on music theory, composition and the WSU Symphonic Band and Wind Ensemble. His final concert will exclusively feature music he’s composed during his time at WSU, performed by the WSU Symphonic Band and Wind Ensemble and the WSU combined choirs.

“We’ve always done concerts together back as far as I can remember,” professor Mark Henderson, head of choral studies at WSU, said. Henderson explained that he and Root arrived at WSU within one year of each other. Since then, Henderson said the two have been happily working together on various projects.

Henderson said he would describe Root as an ideal colleague—personable, cooperative and very supportive.

“I never composed in college because we were required to do what was in academic style at the time, and I wasn’t interested in that,” Henderson said. “He was composing something almost once a year and I thought that was great. I think it kind of freed me to go ahead and compose the kind of things I wanted.”

Henderson said he recalled a time when he and Root attended a performance with a group of students. During the performance, Root whispered to the students, pointing out a favorite chord of his, an augmented sixth chord. Henderson was impressed by this experience and admired how Root continued to analyze the music and teach his students even though they weren’t in an academic setting.

Andrew Stapley, WSU senior in music education, said he appreciates Root’s attitude towards students and their unique situations.

“He really cares about everyone and he really wants them to succeed,” Stapley said. “As far as being a professor, he’s willing to work with all types of situations and help students do their best.”

Catie Omer, a graduate in vocal pedagogy, was one such student. Omer thought she would be able to graduate with no problems, but found to her great distress that she had overlooked one rarely taught class. Root offered to give Omer private lessons in the subject so she could proceed with her plans to graduate rather than having to take another semester worth of classes for one required class.

“My voice teacher Gary Sorensen once said (Root) is truly the salt of the Earth, and I would have to agree with him,” Omer said. “(Root) does anything and everything for his students for them to be successful.”

In addition, Omer said much of Root’s music is easy to enjoy, even if the listener doesn’t have a background in music.

“It reminds me a lot of movie music,” Omer said. “I know (Root) aspired to be a film composer when he was younger, and that very much shows through in his style. When you perform and listen to his music, you get that big, grand feeling.”

Root’s final concert will be March 24 at 7:30 p.m. in the Austad Theater of the Val A. Browning Center for the Performing Arts. Tickets are $6 and $7 and are available online or at the box office prior to the performance.

 

Root started teaching at WSU in 1984. Tuesday’s concert will mark the end of his career at WSU. (Courtesy of the Telitha E. Lindquist College of Arts & Humanities)

While the Val A. Browning Center holds so many beginnings for students, on March 24 it will fill with finality as professor Thomas Root performs in his last concert as director of the WSU Band.

Root has taught music at Weber State University for just over 30 years, focusing on music theory, composition and the WSU Symphonic Band and Wind Ensemble. His final concert will exclusively feature music he’s composed during his time at WSU, performed by the WSU Symphonic Band and Wind Ensemble and the WSU combined choirs.

“We’ve always done concerts together back as far as I can remember,” professor Mark Henderson, head of choral studies at WSU, said. Henderson explained that he and Root arrived at WSU within one year of each other. Since then, Henderson said the two have been happily working together on various projects.

Henderson said he would describe Root as an ideal colleague—personable, cooperative and very supportive.

“I never composed in college because we were required to do what was in academic style at the time, and I wasn’t interested in that,” Henderson said. “He was composing something almost once a year and I thought that was great. I think it kind of freed me to go ahead and compose the kind of things I wanted.”

Henderson said he recalled a time when he and Root attended a performance with a group of students. During the performance, Root whispered to the students, pointing out a favorite chord of his, an augmented sixth chord. Henderson was impressed by this experience and admired how Root continued to analyze the music and teach his students even though they weren’t in an academic setting.

Andrew Stapley, WSU senior in music education, said he appreciates Root’s attitude towards students and their unique situations.

“He really cares about everyone and he really wants them to succeed,” Stapley said. “As far as being a professor, he’s willing to work with all types of situations and help students do their best.”

Catie Omer, a graduate in vocal pedagogy, was one such student. Omer thought she would be able to graduate with no problems, but found to her great distress that she had overlooked one rarely taught class. Root offered to give Omer private lessons in the subject so she could proceed with her plans to graduate rather than having to take another semester worth of classes for one required class.

“My voice teacher Gary Sorensen once said (Root) is truly the salt of the Earth, and I would have to agree with him,” Omer said. “(Root) does anything and everything for his students for them to be successful.”

In addition, Omer said much of Root’s music is easy to enjoy, even if the listener doesn’t have a background in music.

“It reminds me a lot of movie music,” Omer said. “I know (Root) aspired to be a film composer when he was younger, and that very much shows through in his style. When you perform and listen to his music, you get that big, grand feeling.”

Root’s final concert will be March 24 at 7:30 p.m. in the Austad Theater of the Val A. Browning Center for the Performing Arts. Tickets are $6 and $7 and are available online or at the box office prior to the performance.

 

"Gliss Riffer" by Dan Deacon

“Gliss Riffer” by Dan Deacon

“Gliss Riffer,” Dan Deacon’s most recent album, debuted earlier in February. Following his previous works “Bromst” and “America,” Deacon creates an electronically driven theme with his new work. Influenced by artists like Talking Heads, Devo and Daft Punk, Deacon creates electronic beats fused with orchestral elements.

The short album presents elements that fans of electronic music can really appreciate. For non-electronic music listeners though, it can be easy to get lost in the repetitive emptiness of electronic sound.

For example, the track “Meme Generator” has interesting elements and easily catches the listeners attention, but the same elements repeat over and over for nearly five minutes. It’s comparable to listening to a Metallica song and zoning out for a long period of time, then coming back to the music and realizing it’s on a different song. It’s kind of trippy and a little bit unnerving.

The best song on the album is “Learning to Relax.” The track almost sounds like an 80′s pop tune with its high energy and interesting lyrics. It has repetitive elements as well but none that make the listener zone out.

Also, the track “Take it to the Max,” adds an interesting element to the album. The song as many layers that are slowly pile on top of each other. Using different stacked elements feels as if the song is building up to something.

If Deacon is an artist you come to enjoy, other artists like Animal Collective, and previously reviewed artist Panda Bear will fulfill your electronic needs. Two stars would have to be the rating for this album because this type of music caters to such a specific fan base, which I am not a part of.

“Gliss Riffer” by Dan Deacon

“Gliss Riffer,” Dan Deacon’s most recent album, debuted earlier in February. Following his previous works “Bromst” and “America,” Deacon creates an electronically driven theme with his new work. Influenced by artists like Talking Heads, Devo and Daft Punk, Deacon creates electronic beats fused with orchestral elements.

The short album presents elements that fans of electronic music can really appreciate. For non-electronic music listeners though, it can be easy to get lost in the repetitive emptiness of electronic sound.

For example, the track “Meme Generator” has interesting elements and easily catches the listeners attention, but the same elements repeat over and over for nearly five minutes. It’s comparable to listening to a Metallica song and zoning out for a long period of time, then coming back to the music and realizing it’s on a different song. It’s kind of trippy and a little bit unnerving.

The best song on the album is “Learning to Relax.” The track almost sounds like an 80′s pop tune with its high energy and interesting lyrics. It has repetitive elements as well but none that make the listener zone out.

Also, the track “Take it to the Max,” adds an interesting element to the album. The song as many layers that are slowly pile on top of each other. Using different stacked elements feels as if the song is building up to something.

If Deacon is an artist you come to enjoy, other artists like Animal Collective, and previously reviewed artist Panda Bear will fulfill your electronic needs. Two stars would have to be the rating for this album because this type of music caters to such a specific fan base, which I am not a part of.

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